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The impact of banks’ capital adequacy regulation on the economic system: an agent-based approach

Author

Listed:
  • Andrea Teglio

    () (LEE & Department of Economics, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón, Spain)

  • Marco Raberto

    () (University of Genova, Genova, Italy)

  • Silvano Cincotti

    () (University of Genova, Genova, Italy)

Abstract

Since the start of the financial crisis in 2007, the debate on the proper level leverage of financial institutions has been flourishing. The paper addresses such crucial issue within the Eurace arti?cial economy, by considering the effects that different choices of capital adequacy ratios for banks have on main economic indicators. The study also gives us the opportunity to examine the outcomes of the Eurace model so to discuss the nature of endogenous money, giving a contribution to a debate that has grown stronger over the last two decades. A set of 40 years long simulations have been performed and examined in the short (first 5 years), medium (the following 15 years) and long (the last 20 years) run. Results point out a non-trivial dependence of real economic variables such as the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the unemployment rate and the aggregate capital stock on banks’ capital adequacy ratios; this dependence is in place due to the credit channel and varies significantly according to the chosen evaluation horizon. In general, while boosting the economy in the short run, regulations allowing for a high leverage of the banking system tend to be depressing in the medium and long run. Results also point out that the stock of money is driven by the demand for loans, therefore supporting the theory of endogenous nature of credit money.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrea Teglio & Marco Raberto & Silvano Cincotti, 2011. "The impact of banks’ capital adequacy regulation on the economic system: an agent-based approach," Working Papers 2011/01, Economics Department, Universitat Jaume I, Castellón (Spain).
  • Handle: RePEc:jau:wpaper:2011/01
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Blum, Jurg & Hellwig, Martin, 1995. "The macroeconomic implications of capital adequacy requirements for banks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(3-4), pages 739-749, April.
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    5. Martin Hellwig, 2010. "Capital Regulation after the Crisis: Business as Usual?," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 8(2), pages 40-46, 07.
    6. Cincotti, Silvano & Raberto, Marco & Teglio, Andrea, 2010. "Credit money and macroeconomic instability in the agent-based model and simulator Eurace," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 4, pages 1-32.
    7. Steven M. Fazzari & R. Glenn Hubbard & Bruce C. Petersen, 1988. "Financing Constraints and Corporate Investment," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(1), pages 141-206.
    8. Caballero, Ricardo J, 1992. "A Fallacy of Composition," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1279-1292, December.
    9. Giuseppe Fontana, 2003. "Post Keynesian Approaches to Endogenous Money: A time framework explanation," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 291-314.
    10. Raberto, Marco & Teglio, Andrea & Cincotti, Silvano, 2012. "Debt, deleveraging and business cycles: An agent-based perspective," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 6, pages 1-49.
    11. Adrian, Tobias & Shin, Hyun Song, 2010. "Liquidity and leverage," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 418-437, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Popoyan, Lilit & Napoletano, Mauro & Roventini, Andrea, 2017. "Taming macroeconomic instability: Monetary and macro-prudential policy interactions in an agent-based model," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 117-140.
    2. repec:spr:italej:v:3:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s40797-017-0060-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Raberto, Marco & Teglio, Andrea & Cincotti, Silvano, 2012. "Debt, deleveraging and business cycles: An agent-based perspective," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 6, pages 1-49.
    4. Giovanni Dosi & Andrea Roventini, 2017. "Agent-Based Macroeconomics and Classical Political Economy: Some Italian Roots," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 3(3), pages 261-283, November.
    5. Alberto Russo, 2017. "An Agent Based Macroeconomic Model with Social Classes and Endogenous Crises," Italian Economic Journal: A Continuation of Rivista Italiana degli Economisti and Giornale degli Economisti, Springer;Società Italiana degli Economisti (Italian Economic Association), vol. 3(3), pages 285-306, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agent-based models; banking regulation;

    JEL classification:

    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services

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