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Common Law Marriage and Couple Formation

Author

Listed:
  • Grossbard, Shoshana

    () (San Diego State University)

  • Vernon, Victoria

    () (Empire State College)

Abstract

The Current Population Survey is used to investigate effects of Common Law Marriage (CLM) on whether young US-born adults live in couples in the U.S. CLM effects are identified through cross-state and time variation, as some states abolished CLM over the period examined. Analysis based on Gary Becker's marriage economics helps explain why CLM affects couple formation and does so differently depending on education, sex ratios and parent status. CLM reduces in-couple residence, and more so for childless whites and where there are fewer men per woman. Effects are larger for college-educated men and women without college.

Suggested Citation

  • Grossbard, Shoshana & Vernon, Victoria, 2014. "Common Law Marriage and Couple Formation," IZA Discussion Papers 8480, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8480
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Shoshana Grossbard, 2016. "Should common law marriage be abolished?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 256-256, May.
    2. Shoshana Grossbard & Victoria Vernon, 2017. "Common Law Marriage and Teen Births," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 129-145, March.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Common-Law Marriage; couple; couple formation; marriage; cohabitation; Gary Becker;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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