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Wage Elasticity of the Teacher Supply in Switzerland

  • Wolter, Stefan C.

    ()

    (University of Bern)

  • Denzler, Stefan

    ()

    (Swiss Co-ordination Center for Research in Education)

In order to learn more about the wage elasticity of the teacher supply in Switzerland, this paper estimates wages for teachers and non-teachers. The data used are ten surveys of graduates of all Swiss universities for the period of 1981-1999. The data allows us to estimate the wage elasticity for entry wages of upper secondary school teachers. In the cases examined, the wage differential is highly significant and shows a wage elasticity for the teacher supply of 0.12% to 0.18%. This elasticity is substantially lower than what has been found in the literature for other countries. It is probably due to the fact that teachers’ salaries are generally high in Switzerland - teachers here enjoy a positive wage differential over those in other occupations, the opposite of what is normally the situation elsewhere.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 733.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2003
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Brussels Economic Review / Cahiers Economiques de Bruxelles, 2004, 47 (3), 387-408
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp733
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  1. Peter Temin, 2002. "Teacher Quality and the Future of America," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 28(3), pages 285-300, Summer.
  2. Dale Ballou & Michael Podgursky, 1998. "Teacher recruitment and retention in public and private schools," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(3), pages 393-417.
  3. Richard J. Murnane & Randall J. Olsen, 1990. "The Effects of Salaries and Opportunity Costs on Length of Stay in Teaching: Evidence from North Carolina," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(1), pages 106-124.
  4. Hanushek, E.A.omson, W., 1996. "Assessing the Effects of School Resources on Student Performance : An Update," RCER Working Papers 424, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  5. Dolton, Peter J, 1990. "The Economics of UK Teacher Supply: The Graduate's Decision," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(400), pages 91-104, Supplemen.
  6. Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 1999. "Do Higher Salaries Buy Better Teachers?," NBER Working Papers 7082, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Susanna Loeb & Marianne E. Page, 2000. "Examining The Link Between Teacher Wages And Student Outcomes: The Importance Of Alternative Labor Market Opportunities And Non-Pecuniary Variation," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 393-408, August.
  8. Hanushek, Eric A. & Pace, Richard R., 1995. "Who chooses to teach (and why)?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 101-117, June.
  9. Murnane, Richard J & Olsen, Randall J, 1989. "The Effects of Salaries and Opportunity Costs on Duration in Teaching: Evidence from Michigan," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 71(2), pages 347-52, May.
  10. Dolton, P. J. & Makepeace, G. H., 1993. "Female labour force participation and the choice of occupation: The supply of teachers," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(7), pages 1393-1411, October.
  11. Peter Temin, 2002. "Teacher Quality and the Future of America," NBER Working Papers 8898, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Dolton, Peter J & van der Klaauw, Wilbert, 1995. "Leaving Teaching in the UK: A Duration Analysis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(429), pages 431-44, March.
  13. Eric A. Hanushek & EJohn F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 2004. "Why Public Schools Lose Teachers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(2).
  14. R. Mark Gritz & Neil D. Theobald, 1996. "The Effects of School District Spending Priorities on Length of Stay in Teaching," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(3), pages 477-512.
  15. Mont, Daniel & Rees, Daniel I, 1996. "The Influence of Classroom Characteristics on High School Teacher Turnover," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(1), pages 152-67, January.
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