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Teacher recruitment and retention in public and private schools

Author

Listed:
  • Dale Ballou

    (Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts at Amherst)

  • Michael Podgursky

    (Department of Economics, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia, 118 Professional Building, Columbia, MO 65211)

Abstract

Private school salaries are substantially below those in public school systems. Nonetheless, private school heads are as satisfied as public school principals with the quality of their new teachers and substantially more satisfied with their experienced instructors. This difference remains after controlling for school and community characteristics and for the principal's tenure and educational priorities. In addition, appraisals of experienced and new teachers suggest that private schools are more successful in retaining the best of their new teachers and in developing the teaching skills of their faculties. Apparent reasons include greater flexibility in structuring pay, more supervision and mentoring of new teachers, and freedom to dismiss teachers for poor performance. These findings suggest that improvement in the quality of public school performance will require the use of accountability tools such as pay-for-performance and dismissal.

Suggested Citation

  • Dale Ballou & Michael Podgursky, 1998. "Teacher recruitment and retention in public and private schools," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(3), pages 393-417.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jpamgt:v:17:y:1998:i:3:p:393-417
    DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1520-6688(199822)17:3<393::AID-PAM2>3.0.CO;2-B
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Caroline Minter Hoxby, 1996. "How Teachers' Unions Affect Education Production," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(3), pages 671-718.
    2. Dale Ballou, 1996. "Do Public Schools Hire the Best Applicants?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(1), pages 97-133.
    3. Monk, David H., 1994. "Subject area preparation of secondary mathematics and science teachers and student achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 125-145, June.
    4. Gary Chamberlain, 1980. "Analysis of Covariance with Qualitative Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 225-238.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Podgursky, 2006. "Is Teacher Pay Adequate?," Working Papers 0601, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
    2. Bonesronning, Hans & Falch, Torberg & Strom, Bjarne, 2005. "Teacher sorting, teacher quality, and student composition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 457-483, February.
    3. Feng, Li, 2005. "Hire Today, Gone Tomorrow: The Determinants of Attrition among Public School Teachers," MPRA Paper 589, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Terance J. Rephann & Tanya Wanchek, 2012. "Filling the Gaps: Dentist Disparities along the Rural Urban Continuum," Working Papers 2012-02, Center for Economic and Policy Studies.
    5. Stefan C. Wolter & Stefan Denzler, 2004. "Wage elasticity of the teacher supply in Switzerland," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 47(3-4), pages 387-408.
    6. Tanya Wanchek & Terance J. Rephann & William Shobe, 2011. "Oral Health and the Dental Care Workforce in Southwest Virginia," Reports 2011-03, Center for Economic and Policy Studies.
    7. Elizabeth Webster & Mark Wooden & Gary Marks, 2004. "Reforming the Labour Market for Australian Teachers," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2004n28, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    8. Francis Green & Stephen Machin & Richard Murphy & Yu Zhu, 2008. "Competition for private and state school teachers," CEE Discussion Papers 0094, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    9. Jean-Michel Plassard & Nhu Tran Thi Thanh, 2009. "Liberté de choix des élèves et concurrence des établissements : un survey de l'analyse du pilotage des systèmes éducatifs par les quasi-marchés," Revue d'économie industrielle, De Boeck Université, vol. 0(2), pages 99-130.
    10. Goldhaber, Dan & Destler, Katharine & Player, Daniel, 2010. "Teacher labor markets and the perils of using hedonics to estimate compensating differentials in the public sector," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 1-17, February.
    11. Hans Bonesrønning & Torberg Falch & Bjarne Strøm, 2003. "Teacher Sorting, Teacher Quality, and Student Composition: Evidence from Norway," Working Paper Series 3403, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.
    12. Tanya Wanchek, 2010. "Dental Hygiene Regulation and Access to Oral Healthcare: Assessing the Variation across the US States," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 48(4), pages 706-725, December.

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