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Work-Related Health in Europe: Are Older Workers More at Risk?


  • Latreille, Paul L.

    () (University of Sheffield)

  • Sloane, Peter J.

    () (Swansea University)

  • Staneva, Anita

    () (University of Sydney)


This paper uses the fourth European Working Conditions Survey (2005) to address the impact of age on work-related self-reported health outcomes. More specifically, the paper examines whether older workers differ significantly from younger workers regarding their job-related health risk perception, mental and physical health, sickness absence, probability of reporting injury and fatigue. Accounting for the 'healthy worker effect', or sample selection – in so far as unhealthy workers are likely to exit the labour force – we find that as a group, those aged 55-65 years are more 'vulnerable' than younger workers: they are more likely to perceive work-related health and safety risks, and to report mental, physical and fatigue health problems. As previously shown, older workers are more likely to report work-related absence.

Suggested Citation

  • Latreille, Paul L. & Sloane, Peter J. & Staneva, Anita, 2011. "Work-Related Health in Europe: Are Older Workers More at Risk?," IZA Discussion Papers 6044, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6044

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Lixin Cai & Guyonne Kalb, 2006. "Health status and labour force participation: evidence from Australia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(3), pages 241-261.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maria Mercedes Teijeiro Álvarez (ed.), 2013. "Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación," E-books Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación, Asociación de Economía de la Educación, edition 1, volume 8, number 08, Winter.

    More about this item


    mental health; physical health; absence; fatigue; endogeneity; healthy worker selection effect;

    JEL classification:

    • I0 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy
    • J81 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Working Conditions
    • J20 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - General

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