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What Drives U.S. Immigration Policy? Evidence from Congressional Roll Call Votes

Author

Listed:
  • Facchini, Giovanni

    () (University of Nottingham)

  • Steinhardt, Max F.

    () (Free University of Berlin)

Abstract

Immigration is one of the most hotly debated policy issues in the United States today. Despite marked divergence of opinions within political parties, several important immigration reforms were introduced in the post 1965 era. The purpose of this paper is to systematically analyze the drivers of congressional voting behavior on immigration policy during the period 1970-2006, and in particular, to assess the role of economic factors at the district level. Our findings provide robust evidence that representatives of more skilled labor abundant constituencies are more likely to support an open immigration policy concerning unskilled labor. Thus, a simple factor-proportions-analysis model provides useful insights regarding the policy making process on one of the most controversial facets of globalization.

Suggested Citation

  • Facchini, Giovanni & Steinhardt, Max F., 2011. "What Drives U.S. Immigration Policy? Evidence from Congressional Roll Call Votes," IZA Discussion Papers 5561, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5561
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    political economy; voting; immigration policy;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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