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A New Estimator of Search Duration and Its Application to the Marriage Market

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  • Jelnov, Pavel

    () (Leibniz University of Hannover)

Abstract

It is well known that female age at first marriage positively correlates with male income inequality. The common interpretation of this fact is that marital search takes longer when the pool of potential mates is more unequal. This paper challenges that interpretation with a novel econometric method. I utilize the fact that the female age at first marriage was shown to be a sum of a skewed term, possibly related to search, and a normally distributed residual. I estimate search duration as the expected skewed term. I find that in the American data this term does not positively correlate with male income inequality and female education.

Suggested Citation

  • Jelnov, Pavel, 2018. "A New Estimator of Search Duration and Its Application to the Marriage Market," IZA Discussion Papers 11466, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11466
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    marital search; marriage age; inequality; female education;

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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