IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iza/izadps/dp11398.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A Detailed Analysis of Childhood Victimization Using National Registers: Forms and Sequencing of Violence and Domestic Abuse

Author

Listed:
  • Gorinas, Cédric

    () (Danish National Centre for Social Research (SFI))

Abstract

Using highly detailed longitudinal data from Danish registers, this study overcomes limitations inherent in victimization surveys and compares the role of individual and family characteristics for five forms of childhood violence, including sexual assaults and threats. The study also examines repeated and poly-victimization and the factors underlying abuse by different types of domestic perpetrators. This study finds that children aged 0 to 12 are the most exposed to sexual abuse, aggravated violence, and domestic abuse; that 30% of young victims of sex and threats will be victimized again; and that the economic and physical vulnerability of the mother in particular is a strong risk factor for early abuse. This study shows the importance of national registers in uncovering under-researched areas of childhood victimization and identifying the most vulnerable groups.

Suggested Citation

  • Gorinas, Cédric, 2018. "A Detailed Analysis of Childhood Victimization Using National Registers: Forms and Sequencing of Violence and Domestic Abuse," IZA Discussion Papers 11398, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11398
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp11398.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Horst Entorf, 2015. "Economic Factors of Victimization: Evidence from Germany," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 16(4), pages 391-407, November.
    2. W. David Allen, 2007. "The Reporting and Underreporting of Rape," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(3), pages 623-641, January.
    3. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote, 1999. "Why Is There More Crime in Cities?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(S6), pages 225-258, December.
    4. Steven D. Levitt, 1999. "The changing relationship between income and crime victimization," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Sep, pages 87-98.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    victimization; domestic crime; violence; child abuse;

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11398. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Fallak). General contact details of provider: http://www.iza.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.