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Offenders as victims of crime?: an investigation into the relationship between criminal behaviour and victimization

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  • Derek Deadman
  • Ziggy MacDonald

Abstract

We consider the association between victimization and offending behaviour by using data from the Youth Lifestyles Survey. We consider the effect of violent and non-violent offending on the probability of being a victim of violent and non-violent crime and find a positive association between these by using univariate probit estimates. However, taking into account the endog- enous nature of offending and victimization via a bivariate probit model, we find that univariate estimates understate the association. We suggest that policy recommendations should only be informed by the bivariate analysis of the association between offending and victimization. Copyright 2004 Royal Statistical Society.

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  • Derek Deadman & Ziggy MacDonald, 2004. "Offenders as victims of crime?: an investigation into the relationship between criminal behaviour and victimization," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 167(1), pages 53-67.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jorssa:v:167:y:2004:i:1:p:53-67
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    1. Allen, Jim & van der Velden, Rolf, 2001. "Educational Mismatches versus Skill Mismatches: Effects on Wages, Job Satisfaction, and On-the-Job Search," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 434-452, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bridges, Sarah & Disney, Richard, 2010. "Debt and depression," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, pages 388-403.
    2. Ali Fakih & Pascal L. Ghazalian, 2015. "What factors influence firm perceptions of labour market constraints to growth in the MENA region?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(8), pages 1181-1206, November.
    3. Richard Disney & Sarah Bridges, "undated". "Debt and depression," Discussion Papers 06/02, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
    4. George Saridakis & Sandra Sookram, 2014. "Violent Crime and Perceived Deterrence: An Empirical Approach using the Offending Crime and Justice Survey," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 19(1), pages 23-56, March.
    5. Lyssenko, Nikita & Martinez-Espineira, Roberto, 2009. "`Been there done that': Disentangling option value effects from user heterogeneity when valuing natural resources with a use component," MPRA Paper 21976, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 08 Apr 2010.
    6. Saridakis George, 2013. "Shop Crime and Deterrence: Evidence on Shoplifting among Young People in the Youth Lifestyle Survey (YLS)," Review of Law & Economics, De Gruyter, pages 197-237.
    7. D. Fabbri & C. Monfardini & R. Radice, 2004. "Testing exogeneity in the bivariate probit model: Monte Carlo evidence and an application to health economics," Working Papers 514, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    8. Entorf, Horst, 2013. "Criminal Victims, Victimized Criminals, or Both? A Deeper Look at the Victim-Offender Overlap," IZA Discussion Papers 7686, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Chuhui Li & Donald S. Poskitt & Xueyan Zhao, 2016. "The Bivariate Probit Model, Maximum Likelihood Estimation, Pseudo True Parameters and Partial Identification," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 16/16, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
    10. Georgios Papadopoulos, 2013. "Immigration Status and Victimization: Evidence from the British Crime Survey," University of East Anglia Applied and Financial Economics Working Paper Series 042, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..

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