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An Injury to One Is an Injury to All: Terrorism's Spillover Effects on Bilateral Trade

Listed author(s):
  • Pham, Cong S.

    ()

    (Deakin University)

  • Doucouliagos, Chris

    ()

    (Deakin University)

In this paper we investigate whether the effects of terrorism in one country spillover to affect trade in neighboring nations. Using a sample of more than 160 countries from 1976 to 2014, we report robust evidence that terrorist attacks in a nation's contiguous neighbors significantly reduce bilateral trade. Each additional terrorist attack in a neighboring country reduces bilateral trade by nearly 0.013% on average, which translates into a reduction of about $6.4 million USD in total trade. Trade effects from terrorist incidents are higher in sub-Sahara. Adverse trade effects hold for different flow and stock measures of terrorism, and even for terrorist incidents with zero casualties. Spillovers from terrorism are relatively long-lived, depressing bilateral trade up to five years after a terrorist event. Our findings are consistent with terrorism adversely impacting bilateral trade through several channels: psychological distress, higher trade costs arising from increased trade insecurity and regulatory burden, and adverse effects on income and trade reform.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 10859.

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Length: 60 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2017
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10859
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  1. Ades, Alberto & Chua, Hak B, 1997. "Thy Neighbor's Curse: Regional Instability and Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 279-304, September.
  2. Easterly, William & Levine, Ross, 1998. "Troubles with the Neighbours: Africa's Problem, Africa's Opportunity," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 7(1), pages 120-142, March.
  3. Simeon Djankov & Caroline Freund & Cong S. Pham, 2010. "Trading on Time," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(1), pages 166-173, February.
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  8. Eric Neumayer & Thomas Plümper, 2016. "Spatial spill-overs from terrorism on tourism: Western victims in Islamic destination countries," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 169(3), pages 195-206, December.
  9. José de Sousa & Daniel Mirza & Thierry Verdier, 2009. "Trade and the Spillovers of Transnational Terrorism," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 145(IV), pages 453-461, December.
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  14. Subhayu Bandyopadhyay & Todd Sandler & Javed Younas, 2014. "Foreign direct investment, aid, and terrorism," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 66(1), pages 25-50, January.
  15. Michele Fratianni & Heejoon Kang, 2006. "International Terrorism, International Trade, and Borders," Working Papers 2006-13, Indiana University, Kelley School of Business, Department of Business Economics and Public Policy.
  16. Enders, Walter & Sandler, Todd & Parise, Gerald F, 1992. "An Econometric Analysis of the Impact of Terrorism on Tourism," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(4), pages 531-554.
  17. Michael R Czinkota & Gary Knight & Peter W Liesch & John Steen, 2010. "Terrorism and international business: A research agenda," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 41(5), pages 826-843, June.
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