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Immigrant Labor Market Integration across Admission Classes

Author

Listed:
  • Bratsberg, Bernt

    () (Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research)

  • Raaum, Oddbjørn

    () (Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research)

  • Røed, Knut

    () (Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research)

Abstract

We examine patterns of labor market integration across immigrant groups. The study draws on Norwegian longitudinal administrative data covering labor earnings and social insurance claims over a 25-year period and presents a comprehensive picture of immigrant-native employment and social insurance differentials by admission class and by years since entry. For refugees and family immigrants from low-income source countries, we uncover encouraging signs of labor market integration during an initial period upon admission, but after just 5-10 years, the integration process goes into reverse with widening immigrant-native employment differentials and rising rates of immigrant social insurance dependency. Yet, the analysis reveals substantial heterogeneity within admission class and points to an important role of host-country schooling for successful immigrant labor market integration.

Suggested Citation

  • Bratsberg, Bernt & Raaum, Oddbjørn & Røed, Knut, 2017. "Immigrant Labor Market Integration across Admission Classes," IZA Discussion Papers 10513, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10513
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christian Dustmann & Francesco Fasani & Tommaso Frattini & Luigi Minale & Uta Schönberg, 2017. "On the economics and politics of refugee migration," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 32(91), pages 497-550.
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    7. Bernt Bratsberg & Erling Barth & Oddbjørn Raaum, 2006. "Local Unemployment and the Relative Wages of Immigrants: Evidence from the Current Population Surveys," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(2), pages 243-263, May.
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    13. Bratsberg, Bernt & Fevang, Elisabeth & Røed, Knut, 2013. "Job loss and disability insurance," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 137-150.
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    15. Erling Barth & Bernt Bratsberg & Oddbjørn Raaum, 2004. "Identifying Earnings Assimilation of Immigrants under Changing Macroeconomic Conditions," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 106(1), pages 1-22, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fasani, Francesco & Frattini, Tommaso & Minale, Luigi, 2018. "(The Struggle for) Refugee Integration into the Labour Market: Evidence from Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 11333, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Ansala, Laura & Åslund, Olof & Sarvim¨aki, Matti, 2018. "Immigration history, entry jobs, and the labor market integration of immigrants," Working Paper Series 2018:20, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    3. repec:eee:labeco:v:59:y:2019:i:c:p:1-16 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Finseraas, Henning & Roed, Marianne & Schone, Pal, 2018. "Labour Immigration and Union Strength," IZA Discussion Papers 11723, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Dries Lens & Ive Marx & SunÄ ica Vujić, 2017. "Integrating (former) asylum seekers into the Belgian labour market. What can we learn from the recent past?," Working Papers 1710, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    6. Francesco Fasani & Tommaso Frattini & Luigi Minale, 2017. "The (Struggle for) Labour Market Integration of Refugees: Evidence from European Countries," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1716, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    7. Lens, Dries & Marx, Ive & Vujic, Suncica, 2018. "Is Quick Formal Access to the Labor Market Enough? Refugees' Labor Market Integration in Belgium," IZA Discussion Papers 11905, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Eric Schuss, 2017. "Substantial Labor Market Effects of the Residency Status: How Important Are Initial Conditions at Arrival for Immigrants?," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 952, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; refugees; assimilation; social insurance;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • H55 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Social Security and Public Pensions
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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