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Frictional and Non Frictional Unemployment in Models with Matching Frictions

  • José Ramón García Martínez


    (Dpto. Análisis Económico)

  • Valeri Sorolla


    (Dpt. Economia i d'Història Econòmica)

This paper uses a model with a matching function in the labor market, where matches last for one period, to obtain the amount of frictional and non frictional (rationed/disequilibrium) unemployment for different standard wage-setting rules when there are matching frictions. We also compute the frictional and non frictional unemployment rate for two economies characterized by different labor market institutions, namely the Spanish and US economies. The empirical analysis takes into account two types of micro-foundations of the matching function: coordination failure and mismatch due to heterogeneity in the labor market. The empirical findings for Spain suggest that approximately half of all unemployment is due to job rationing and the other half to frictional and mismatch problems. However, the rationing unemployment rate for the US economy represents, two thirds of all unemployment on average, while frictional and mismatch problems account for only a third.

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Paper provided by Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie) in its series Working Papers. Serie AD with number 2013-02.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2013
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published by Ivie
Handle: RePEc:ivi:wpasad:2013-02
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