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Labor matching: putting the pieces together

  • Anton A. Cheremukhin

The original Mortensen-Pissarides model possesses two elements that are absent from the commonly used simplified version: the job destruction margin and training costs. I find that these two elements enable a model driven by a single aggregate shock to simultaneously explain most movements involving unemployment, vacancies, job destruction, job creation, the job finding rate and wages. The job destruction margin's role in propagating aggregate shocks is to create an additional pool of unemployed at the onset of a recession. The role of training costs is to explain the simultaneous decline in vacancies and slow response of job creation.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas in its series Working Papers with number 1102.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:fip:feddwp:1102
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