IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/iuj/wpaper/ems_2012_14.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Extensive vs. Intensive Margin in Japan

Author

Abstract

This paper studies the role of extensive and intensive margins of labor adjustment overbusiness cycle in Japan. We find that the intensive margin accounts for much of total hours worked variation, and its contribution to the fluctuation of total hours worked is about 77%. This result is in sharp contrast with those in the U.S. and European countries where the extensive margin mainly accounts for the overall variability in total hours worked. The implication of a recent rise in non-regular employment for firms' labor adjustment behavior is also discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Makoto Kakinaka & Hiroaki Miyamoto, 2012. "Extensive vs. Intensive Margin in Japan," Working Papers EMS_2012_14, Research Institute, International University of Japan.
  • Handle: RePEc:iuj:wpaper:ems_2012_14
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.iuj.ac.jp/workingpapers/index.cfm?File=EMS_2012_14.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2012
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. E. Paul Durrenberger, 2012. "Labour," Chapters,in: A Handbook of Economic Anthropology, Second Edition, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Rebick, Marcus, 2005. "The Japanese Employment System: Adapting to a New Economic Environment," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199247240.
    3. Lin, Ching-Yang & Miyamoto, Hiroaki, 2012. "Gross worker flows and unemployment dynamics in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 26(1), pages 44-61.
    4. Barbara Petrongolo & Christopher A. Pissarides, 2008. "The Ins and Outs of European Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 256-262, May.
    5. Ohanian, Lee E. & Raffo, Andrea, 2012. "Aggregate hours worked in OECD countries: New measurement and implications for business cycles," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 40-56.
    6. Esteban-Pretel, Julen & Nakajima, Ryo & Tanaka, Ryuichi, 2011. "Are contingent jobs dead ends or stepping stones to regular jobs? Evidence from a structural estimation," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 513-526, August.
    7. Shigeru Fujita & Garey Ramey, 2009. "The Cyclicality Of Separation And Job Finding Rates," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 50(2), pages 415-430, May.
    8. Merkl, Christian & Wesselbaum, Dennis, 2009. "Extensive vs. intensive margin in Germany and the United States: any differences?," Kiel Working Papers 1563, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    9. Miyamoto, Hiroaki, 2011. "Cyclical behavior of unemployment and job vacancies in Japan," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 214-225.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Alexander Herzog-Stein & Patrick Nüß, 2016. "Extensive versus intensive margin over the business cycle: New evidence for Germany and the United States," IMK Working Paper 163-2016, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    2. Kato, Ryuta Ray & Miyamoto, Hiroaki, 2013. "Fiscal stimulus and labor market dynamics in Japan," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 33-58.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    intensive and extensive margins; labor adjustment; Japanese labor market;

    JEL classification:

    • C10 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - General
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iuj:wpaper:ems_2012_14. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kazumi Imai, Office of Academic Affairs). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/gsiujjp.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.