IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/irv/wpaper/121312.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Offshoring, Exporting, and Jobs

Author

Listed:
  • Jose Luis Groizard

    () (Department of Economics, Universitat de les Illes Balears)

  • Priya Ranjan

    () (Department of Economics, University of California-Irvine)

  • Jose Antonio Rodriguez-Lopez

    () (Department of Economics, University of California-Irvine)

Abstract

We construct a heterogeneous-firm model with a continuum of inputs to study the impact of offshoring on job flows at both the intensive and extensive margins. We identify three channels through which a reduction in the cost of offshoring affects firm-level employment: a job-relocation effect, a productivity effect, and a competition effect. Whether there is net job creation or job destruction crucially depends on the elasticity of substitution between inputs: the greater the elasticity, the more likely it is that offshoring causes overall job destruction. When firms are allowed to export, a reduction in the cost of offshoring makes offshoring firms more productive in the export market, which leads to further job creation. This offshoring-induced job creation due to exporting possibilities increases the likelihood that the overall effect of offshoring on industry employment is positive.

Suggested Citation

  • Jose Luis Groizard & Priya Ranjan & Jose Antonio Rodriguez-Lopez, 2013. "Offshoring, Exporting, and Jobs," Working Papers 121312, University of California-Irvine, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:irv:wpaper:121312
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.economics.uci.edu/files/docs/workingpapers/2012-13/rodriguez-12.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hartmut Egger & Udo Kreickemeier & Jens Wrona, 2017. "Offshoring Domestic Jobs," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: International Trade and Labor Markets Welfare, Inequality and Unemployment, chapter 2, pages 27-70 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    2. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg & Amit Kumar Khandelwal & Nina Pavcnik & Petia Topalova, 2010. "Imported Intermediate Inputs and Domestic Product Growth: Evidence from India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 125(4), pages 1727-1767.
    3. Elhanan Helpman & Oleg Itskhoki, 2010. "Labour Market Rigidities, Trade and Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 77(3), pages 1100-1137.
    4. Davidson, Carl & Matusz, Steven J. & Shevchenko, Andrei, 2008. "Outsourcing Peter To Pay Paul: High-Skill Expectations And Low-Skill Wages With Imperfect Labor Markets," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(04), pages 463-479, September.
    5. Biscourp, Pierre & Kramarz, Francis, 2007. "Employment, skill structure and international trade: Firm-level evidence for France," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 22-51.
    6. Carl Davidson & Steven J. Matusz, 2004. "International Trade and Labor Markets: Theory, Evidence, and Policy Implications," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number itlm.
    7. Mary Amiti & Jozef Konings, 2007. "Trade Liberalization, Intermediate Inputs, and Productivity: Evidence from Indonesia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, pages 1611-1638.
    8. David Hummels & Rasmus J?rgensen & Jakob Munch & Chong Xiang, 2014. "The Wage Effects of Offshoring: Evidence from Danish Matched Worker-Firm Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(6), pages 1597-1629, June.
    9. Gene M. Grossman & Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 2008. "Trading Tasks: A Simple Theory of Offshoring," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 1978-1997, December.
    10. Petia Topalova & Amit Khandelwal, 2011. "Trade Liberalization and Firm Productivity: The Case of India," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 995-1009, August.
    11. Carl Davidson & Steven J. Matusz, 2005. "Trade and Turnover: Theory and Evidence," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, pages 861-880.
    12. Steven J. Davis & R. Jason Faberman & John Haltiwanger, 2006. "The Flow Approach to Labor Markets: New Data Sources and Micro-Macro Links," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(3), pages 3-26, Summer.
    13. Ranjan, Priya, 2013. "Offshoring, unemployment, and wages: The role of labor market institutions," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 172-186.
    14. Moen, Espen R, 1997. "Competitive Search Equilibrium," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(2), pages 385-411, April.
    15. Charles I. Jones, 2011. "Intermediate Goods and Weak Links in the Theory of Economic Development," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 1-28, April.
    16. Ibsen, Rikke & Warzynski, Frederic & Westergård-Nielsen, Niels, 2009. "Employment Growth and International Trade: A Small Open Economy Perspective," Working Papers 09-9, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Groizard, Jose L. & Ranjan, Priya & Rodriguez-Lopez, Antonio, 2014. "Offshoring and jobs: The myriad channels of influence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 221-239.
    2. Jose L. Groizard & Priya Ranjan & Antonio Rodriguez-Lopez, 2015. "Trade Costs And Job Flows: Evidence From Establishment-Level Data," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(1), pages 173-204, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Heterogeneous firms; Employment; Offshoring costs;

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:irv:wpaper:121312. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Jennifer dos Santos). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/deucius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.