IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/irn/wpaper/19-08.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Does integration policy improve labour market, sociocultural and psychological adaptation of asylum-related immigrants? Evidence from Sri Lankans in Switzerland

Author

Listed:
  • Marco Pecoraro
  • Anita Manatschal
  • Eva G. T. Green
  • Philippe Wanner

Abstract

The marked increase of asylum seekers arriving in Western Europe after 2014 has renewed debates on the policy measures countries should put into place to support their integration. Yet, knowledge about the links between integration policy and broader labour market, sociocultural or psychological adjustment in destination countries is still limited. Exploiting a comprehensive integration policy reform in Switzerland, and using survey data from the Health Monitoring of the Swiss Migrant Population, our difference-in-difference analyses reveal substantial policy effects. Provisionally admitted Sri Lankans benefiting from the reform enjoy a higher employment probability (plus 30 percentage points), increased income levels (plus 60 per cent), better language skills and feel less lonely or without a homeland relative to comparable Sri Lankan asylum seekers who did not benefit from the reform. Robustness checks using register data confirm the beneficial policy effect on labour market participation for the whole population of provisionally admitted individuals.

Suggested Citation

  • Marco Pecoraro & Anita Manatschal & Eva G. T. Green & Philippe Wanner, 2019. "Does integration policy improve labour market, sociocultural and psychological adaptation of asylum-related immigrants? Evidence from Sri Lankans in Switzerland," IRENE Working Papers 19-08, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:irn:wpaper:19-08
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: ftp://sitelftp.unine.ch/RePEc/irn/pdfs/WP19-08.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Asylum; Integration Policy; Labour Market; Sociocultural adaptation; Psychological Wellbeing; Difference-in-Differences;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:irn:wpaper:19-08. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sylvain Weber). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/irenech.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.