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Are asylum seekers more likely to work with more inclusive labor market access regulations?

Author

Listed:
  • Slotwinski, Michaela

    () (University of Basel)

  • Stutzer, Alois

    () (University of Basel)

  • Uhlig, Roman

    () (University of Basel)

Abstract

In the face of recent refugee migration, early integration of asylum seekers into the labor market has been proposed as an important mechanism for easing their economic and social lot in the short as well as in the long term. However, little is known about the policies that foster or hamper their participation in the labor market, in particular during the important initial period of their stay in the host country. In order to evaluate whether inclusive labor market policies increase the labor market participation of asylum seekers, we exploit the variation in asylum policies in Swiss cantons to which asylum seekers are randomly allocated. During our study period from 2011 to 2014, the employment rate among asylum seekers varied between 0% and 30.2% across cantons. Our results indicate that labor market access regulations are responsible for a substantial proportion of these dierences, in which an inclusive regime increases participation by 11 percentage points. The marginal eects are larger for asylum seekers who speak a language that is linguistically close to the one in their host canton.

Suggested Citation

  • Slotwinski, Michaela & Stutzer, Alois & Uhlig, Roman, 2018. "Are asylum seekers more likely to work with more inclusive labor market access regulations?," Working papers 2018/08, Faculty of Business and Economics - University of Basel.
  • Handle: RePEc:bsl:wpaper:2018/08
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Melitz, Jacques & Toubal, Farid, 2014. "Native language, spoken language, translation and trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(2), pages 351-363.
    2. Francesco Fasani & Tommaso Frattini & Luigi Minale, 2017. "The (Struggle for) Labour Market Integration of Refugees: Evidence from European Countries," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1716, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    3. Christian Dustmann & Francesco Fasani & Tommaso Frattini & Luigi Minale & Uta Schönberg, 2017. "On the economics and politics of refugee migration," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 32(91), pages 497-550.
    4. repec:oup:ecpoli:v:32:y:2017:i:91:p:447-496. is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Bansak, Kirk & Hainmueller, Jens & Hangartner, Dominik, 2016. "How economic, humanitarian, and religious concerns shape European attitudes toward asylum seekers," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 67898, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Timothy J. Hatton, 2017. "Refugees and asylum seekers, the crisis in Europe and the future of policy," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 32(91), pages 447-496.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Asylum policy; asylum seekers; economic integration; employment ban; labor market access regulation;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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