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Labour outcomes and family background: Evidence from the EU during the recession

Author

Listed:
  • Silvia Avram

    (ISER, University of Essex, U.K.)

  • Olga Canto

    (Universidad de Alcalá and EQUALITAS, Spain)

Abstract

A large body of literature in economics aims to understand the transmission mechanisms through which intergenerational economic and social advantage persists. Evidence shows that individuals born into low socioeconomic status families tend to experience worse labour outcomes when adults than otherwise similar peers. Recessions, however, may have a significant impact on how certain elements of this transmission process operate in some countries but not in others (e.g. due to diverse changes in returns to education or occupation and the role of family networks). Using EU-SILC data for 2005 and 2011 we compare the different role of family background on labour outcomes in five EU countries before and after the Great Recession using a multidimensional family background indicator, that avoids undesirable cohort effects. Our results suggest that family background affects employment prospects and job quality (wages and being on a temporary contract) beyond its effect on education but we do not find significant evidence that this effect is substantially moderated by the economic cycle.

Suggested Citation

  • Silvia Avram & Olga Canto, 2016. "Labour outcomes and family background: Evidence from the EU during the recession," Working Papers 414, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  • Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2016-414
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    family background; labour outcomes; returns to education; European Union; recession.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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