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Incentives from exchange rate regimes in an institutional context


  • Ashima Goyal

    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)


In a simple open economy macromodel, calibrated to the typical institutions and shocks of a densely populated emerging market economy, it is shown that a monetary stimulus preceding a temporary supply shock can abort inflation at minimum output cost, since of the appreciation of exchange rates, accompanying a fall in interest rates and rise in output. Analytic results obtained for two periods are generalized through simulations and validated through estimation. The results imply that one instrument can, in these conditions, achieve both domestic output and exchange rate objectives, since it creates correct incentives for foreign exchange traders who make profits in supporting the policy. Such a policy response is compatible with political constraints; it also imparts limited volatility to the nominal exchange rate around a trend competitive rate, thus encouraging hedging and deepening markets. But strategic interactions imply the optimal policy need not be chosen; supporting institutions are required to coordinate monetary, fiscal policy, and markets to the optimal equilibrium. The analysis gives useful degrees of freedom for Asian emerging markets migrating to exchange rate regimes compatible with more openness.

Suggested Citation

  • Ashima Goyal, 2006. "Incentives from exchange rate regimes in an institutional context," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2006-015r, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
  • Handle: RePEc:ind:igiwpp:2006-015r

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Philippe Aghion & Abhijit Banerjee & Thomas Piketty, 1999. "Dualism and Macroeconomic Volatility," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(4), pages 1359-1397.
    2. Olivier Jeanne & Andrew K. Rose, 2002. "Noise Trading and Exchange Rate Regimes," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(2), pages 537-569.
    3. Goyal, Ashima & Pujari, Ayan Kumar, 2005. "Identifying long run supply curve of India," MPRA Paper 24021, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Ashima Goyal & A. K. Jha, 2005. "Dictatorship, Democracy and Institutions: Macropolicy in China and India," Working Papers id:264, eSocialSciences.
    5. Richard K. Lyons, 2006. "The Microstructure Approach to Exchange Rates," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 026262205x, July.
    6. Svensson, Lars E. O., 2000. "Open-economy inflation targeting," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 155-183, February.
    7. Goyal, Ashima, 2002. "Coordinating monetary and fiscal policies: a role for rules?," MPRA Paper 29200, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Ghosh, Atish R., 2002. "Central bank secrecy in the foreign exchange market," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 253-272, February.
    9. Bhattacharya, Utpal & Weller, Paul, 1997. "The advantage to hiding one's hand: Speculation and central bank intervention in the foreign exchange market," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 251-277, July.
    10. Robert H. Bates & Avner Greif & Margaret Levi & Jean-Laurent Rosenthal, 1998. "Analytic Narratives," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 6355.
    11. Gilles Oudiz & Jeffrey Sachs, 1985. "International Policy Coordination in Dynamic Macroeconomic Models," NBER Chapters,in: International Economic Policy Coordination, pages 274-330 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ashima Goyal, 2014. "History of Monetary Policy in India Since Independence," SpringerBriefs in Economics, Springer, edition 127, number 978-81-322-1961-3, January.
    2. Goyal, Ashima, 2006. "Macroeconomic policy and the exchange rate: working together?," MPRA Paper 27768, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Ashima Goyal, 2012. "The Future Of Financial Liberalization In South Asia," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 19(1), pages 63-96, June.
    4. Ashima Goyal, 2008. "The Structure of inflation, information and labour markets: Implications for monetary policy," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2008-010, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    5. Kapur, Muneesh & Behera, Harendra, 2012. "Monetary Transmission Mechanism in India: A Quarterly Model," MPRA Paper 70631, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Ashima Goyal, 2009. "The Natural Interest Rate In Emerging Markets," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: New And Enduring Themes In Development Economics, chapter 15, pages 333-368 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    7. Goyal, Ashima, 2011. "A general equilibrium open economy model for emerging markets: Monetary policy with a dualistic labor market," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1392-1404, May.
    8. Ashima Goyal, 2010. "Inflationary pressures in South Asia," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 17(2), pages 1-42, December.
    9. Goyal, Ashima, 2012. "Propagation Mechanisms in Inflation: Governance as key," MPRA Paper 46360, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Mishra, Ankita & Mishra, Vinod, 2012. "Evaluating inflation targeting as a monetary policy objective for India," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 1053-1063.

    More about this item


    Emerging market economy; Mundell-Fleming; monetary policy; FX market; supply shocks;

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics


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