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Microfinance Growth and Poverty Reduction in Bangladesh: What Does the Longitudinal Data Say?

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  • Shahidur R. Khandker
  • Hussain A. Samad

Abstract

This paper, using several data sets, investigates whether microcredit programmes, which have been operating in rural Bangladesh for over 20 years, have any long-term effects in improving household income and expenditure and lowering poverty. Both descriptive and econometric analyses show that microcredit programmes helped participants earn higher income, consume more, and thereby lifted many of them out of poverty. Findings also suggest that while participation matters, those who have been with the programmes continuously for the last 20 years do even better. The paper concludes that poverty reduction, in particular the reduction of extreme poverty, due to microcredit intervention can be as high as 9 per cent of the total poverty reduction over the last decade in Bangladesh.

Suggested Citation

  • Shahidur R. Khandker & Hussain A. Samad, 2013. "Microfinance Growth and Poverty Reduction in Bangladesh: What Does the Longitudinal Data Say?," Working Papers 16, Institute of Microfinance (InM).
  • Handle: RePEc:imb:wpaper:16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Imai, Katsushi S. & Gaiha, Raghav & Thapa, Ganesh & Annim, Samuel Kobina, 2012. "Microfinance and Poverty—A Macro Perspective," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1675-1689.
    7. Khandker, Shahidur R. & Khalily, M. A. Baqui & Samad, Hussain A., 2010. "Seasonal and extreme poverty in Bangladesh : evaluating an ultra-poor microfinance project," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5331, The World Bank.
    8. Hossain, Mahabub, 1988. "Credit for alleviation of rural poverty: the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh," Research reports 65, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    13. Craig McIntosh, 2008. "Estimating Treatment Effects from Spatial Policy Experiments: An Application to Ugandan Microfinance," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(1), pages 15-28, February.
    14. Coleman, Brett E., 1999. "The impact of group lending in Northeast Thailand," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 105-141, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mathilde Maîtrot & Miguel Niño-Zarazúa, 2017. "Poverty and wellbeing impacts of microfinance: What do we know?," WIDER Working Paper Series 190, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Khandker, Shahidur R. & Samad, Hussain A., 2013. "Are microcredit participants in Bangladesh trapped in poverty and debt ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6404, The World Bank.
    3. Asadul Islam & Debayan Pakrashi, 2014. "The Microcredit Puzzle: Labour Supply Behaviour of Rural Households in Bangladesh," Monash Economics Working Papers 24-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    4. Dan Brockington & Nicola Banks, 2014. "Exploring the Success of BRAC Tanzania’s Microcredit Programme," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 20214, BWPI, The University of Manchester.

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