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Currency Wars, Coordination, and Capital Controls

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  • Olivier Blanchard

    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

Abstract

The strong monetary policy actions undertaken by advanced economies' central banks have led to complaints of "currency wars" by some emerging-market economies and to widespread demands for more macroeconomic policy coordination. This paper reviews cross-border effects of advanced economies' monetary policies on emerging economies, through goods markets, foreign exchange markets, and financial markets, and examines the scope for coordination. Blanchard concludes that, while advanced economies' monetary policies indeed have had substantial spillover effects on emerging-market economies, there was and still is little room for coordination. He argues that, given the limits on fiscal policy, restrictions on capital flows (i.e., capital controls) were and still are the appropriate macroeconomic instrument to advance the objectives of both macro and financial stability.

Suggested Citation

  • Olivier Blanchard, 2016. "Currency Wars, Coordination, and Capital Controls," Working Paper Series WP16-9, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:iie:wpaper:wp16-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Emiliano Brancaccio & Francesco Saraceno, 2017. "Evolutions and Contradictions in Mainstream Macroeconomics: The Case of Olivier Blanchard," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(3), pages 345-359, July.
    2. Kathryn M. E. Dominguez, 0. "Revisiting Exchange Rate Rules," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 0, pages 1-27.
    3. Scheubel, Beatrice & Stracca, Livio & Tille, Cédric, 2019. "The global financial cycle and capital flow episodes: a wobbly link?," Working Paper Series 2337, European Central Bank.
    4. Barbone Gonzalez, Rodrigo & Khametshin, Dmitry & Peydró, José Luis & Polo, Andrea, 2018. "Hedger of Last Resort: Evidence from Brazilian FX Interventions, Local Credit and Global Financial Cycles," CEPR Discussion Papers 12817, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Gustavo Adler & Carolina Osorio Buitron, 2020. "Tipping the scale? The workings of monetary policy through trade," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 744-759, August.
    6. Pınar Kaya Soylu & Mustafa Okur & Özgür Çatıkkaş & Z. Ayca Altintig, 2020. "Long Memory in the Volatility of Selected Cryptocurrencies: Bitcoin, Ethereum and Ripple," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(6), pages 1-21, May.
    7. Stephanie Guichard, 2017. "10 Years after the Global Financial Crisis: What Have We Learnt About International Capital Flows?," Journal of International Commerce, Economics and Policy (JICEP), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 8(03), pages 1-30, October.
    8. Agnès Bénassy-Quéré & Matthieu Bussière & Pauline Wibaux, 2018. "Trade and currency weapons," Working Papers 2018-08, CEPII research center.
    9. Alfred V. Guender & Hamish McHugh-Smith, 2020. "Financial Openness and Inflation: An Empirical Analysis," Working Papers in Economics 20/18, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
    10. Konstantin Styrin & Yulia Ushakova, 2020. "IBRN Initiative on Interactions of Monetary and Prudential Policies," Russian Journal of Money and Finance, Bank of Russia, vol. 79(3), pages 58-74, September.
    11. Valerio Nispi Landi & Alessandro Schiavone, 2021. "The Effectiveness of Capital Controls," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 183-211, February.
    12. Maurice Obstfeld & Alan M. Taylor, 2017. "International Monetary Relations: Taking Finance Seriously," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 31(3), pages 3-28, Summer.
    13. Oscar Jorda & Alan Taylor & Sanjay Singh, 2019. "The Long-Run Effects of Monetary Policy," 2019 Meeting Papers 1307, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    14. Anton Korinek, 2017. "Currency wars or efficient spillovers?," BIS Working Papers 615, Bank for International Settlements.
    15. Gholamreza Askari & Madjid Eshaghi Gordji & Somayeh Shabani & Jose Antonio Filipe, 2020. "Game Theory and Trade Tensions between Advanced Economies," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(Special 1), pages 50-65.
    16. Sara Eugeni, 2019. "Exchange rate volatility and cooperation in an incomplete markets' economy," Working Papers 2019_02, Durham University Business School.
    17. Anton Korinek, 2016. "Currency Wars or Efficient Spillovers? A General Theory of International Policy Cooperation," NBER Working Papers 23004, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Luiz Awazu Pereira da Silva, 2018. "Financial spillovers, spillbacks, and the scope for international macroprudential policy coordination," BIS Papers, Bank for International Settlements, number 97.
    19. Filippo Gori & Etienne Lepers & Caroline Mehigan, 2020. "Capital flow deflection under the magnifying glass," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1613, OECD Publishing.
    20. Kathryn M. E. Dominguez, 2020. "Revisiting Exchange Rate Rules," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 68(3), pages 693-719, September.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Exchange Rates; Capital Controls; Capital Flows; Monetary Policy; Macroeconomic Policy Coordination;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F3 - International Economics - - International Finance
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission

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