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The Socio-Economic Impact of Favela- Bairro: What do the Data Say?

Author

Listed:
  • Fabio Soares

    (Institute of Economic Research (IPEA) and the International Poverty Center (IPC).)

  • Yuri Suarez Dillon Soares

    () (Office of Evaluation and Oversight at the Inter-American Development Bank.)

Abstract

In this paper the Brazilian Favela-Bairro neighborhood improvememnt program is assessed regarding its impact on the quality of life of slum residents. Census and administrative data are used to assess impacts on services, income, health, and violence. There are three fundamental conclusions that fall out of the analysis. The first is that the program improved neighborhood services, with the benefits accrueing to a greater degree to the neighborhoods poorest quantiles. In terms of value of property, as measured by rent, and the in most of the health outcomes, however, the data did produced evidence of improvement. The second result is that we see a marked difference in the characterization of the project’s impact when no control group is used. In terms of results a reflexive comparison leads to an over-estimation of project benefits. The last result is perhaps the most important, in part because it qualifies most of the findings of this evaluation. Given the high degree of geographic targeting, yet the relatively small size of targeted units, the data available was inadequate to answer many of the fundamental evaluative questions raised in the introduction and throughout the paper.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabio Soares & Yuri Suarez Dillon Soares, 2005. "The Socio-Economic Impact of Favela- Bairro: What do the Data Say?," OVE Working Papers 0805, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:ovewps:0805
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. César P. Bouillon & Luis Tejerina, 2006. "Do We Know What Works?: A Systematic Review of Impact Evaluations of Social Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 2801, Inter-American Development Bank.
    2. Inter-American Development Bank (IDB), 2005. "The Millennium Development Goals in Latin America and the Caribbean: Progress, Priorities and IDB Support for their Implementation," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 53698, February.
    3. Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Laure Pasquier-Doumer & Charlotte Guénard, 2016. "Quel impact des projets de réhabilitation urbaine sur les conditions de vie ? Le cas d’un bidonville à Djibouti," Working Papers 20160002, Université Paris 1 Panthéon Sorbonne, UMR Développement et Sociétés.
    4. Sandrine Mesplé-Somps & Laure Pasquier-Doumer & Charlotte Guénard, 2016. "Evaluation d’impact d’un projet de rénovation urbaine dans la commune de Balbala, Djibouti," Working Papers hal-01438389, HAL.
    5. César P. Bouillon & Luis Tejerina, 2006. "Do We Know What Works?: A Systematic Review of Impact Evaluations of Social Programs in Latin America and the Caribbean," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 80443, Inter-American Development Bank.
    6. Laura Jaitman, 2015. "Urban infrastructure in Latin America and the Caribbean: public policy priorities," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 24(1), pages 1-57, December.

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    Keywords

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    JEL classification:

    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy

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