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Investigating the Role of Neighbourhood Characteristics in Determining Life Satisfaction

  • Robert Drago

    ()

    (Department of Labor Studies and Industrial Relations, Pennsylvania State University)

  • Mark Wooden

    ()

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

  • Yi-Ping Tseng

    ()

    (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne)

Data from a representative survey of adult Australians are analysed for usual and preferred working time across family types. We discover a time divide regardless of gender and family type: many short hours individuals desire longer hours of employment, while many long hours individuals prefer shorter hours. The latter group is larger such that the average employee desires fewer hours across family types, with the exception of lone mothers. For dual-earner couples with children, men average approximately 20 hours more per week than women, a difference that would only decline to 18 hours per week if preferred hours were realized. However, approximately one-fifth of these couples exhibited egalitarian or nearly equal working hours. Egalitarian couples averaged a combined 84 hours per week of employment, tended to share the care of children, were more likely to be non-Australian born, and included marked numbers of women holding degrees and in professional occupations.

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Paper provided by Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne in its series Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series with number wp2004n01.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iae:iaewps:wp2004n01
Contact details of provider: Postal: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 Australia
Phone: +61 3 8344 2100
Fax: +61 3 8344 2111
Web page: http://www.melbourneinstitute.com/
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