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Hoarding of International Reserves: A Comparison of the Asian and Latin American Experiences

  • Yin-wong Cheung

    (University of California, Santa Cruz, USA, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research)

  • Hiro Ito

    (Portland State University, Portland, USA)

We examine the empirical determinants of the demand for international reserves and compare the experiences of some Asian and Latin American economies. Our empirical results indicate that different vintages of the model of international reserves give different inferences about the appropriate level of international reserves. The developed and developing economies have equations of the demand for international reserves that are quite different from each other. Further, the Asian economies and the Latin American economies have different empirical determinants of the demand for international reserves. Our results highlight the complexity of evaluating whether an economy is holding an excessive or deficient level of international reserves of the inference can be heavily dependent on the choice of a benchmark model. A direct comparison affirms the perception that the Asian economies tend to hold more international reserves than the Latin American economies.

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Paper provided by Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research in its series Working Papers with number 072008.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hkm:wpaper:072008
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