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Key Features Of The First Phase Of The National Cluster Program In Russia

Author

Listed:
  • Evgeniy Kutsenko

    () (Centre for S&T, Innovation and Information Policies, Institute for Statistical Studies and Economics of Knowledge, National Research University – Higher School of Economics (HSE),)

  • Dirk Meissner

    () (Deputy Head, Laboratory for Science and Technology Studies, Institute for Statistical Studies and Economics of Knowledge, National Research University Higher School of Economics)

Abstract

Cluster policy is recognized as one of the pivotal elements of state-of-art innovation policy. State support for clusters helps to take into account regional peculiarities and engage the most innovative local actors into the process of innovation policy drafting and implementation. Cluster development stimulates trust building and enhances knowledge spillovers among different organizations in the region. Finally the cluster approach makes innovation policy more systemic by coordinating measures aimed to support different actors (large companies, SMEs, universities, venture funds) towards comprehensive efforts linking the most perspective localized industries (ecosystems). The development of clusters has been determined as one of the priorities of the Strategy of Innovative Development of the Russian Federation for the period to 2020 which was confirmed end 2010. In the framework of this Strategy the first national cluster program was launched in 2012. The paper is devoted to the detailed description of the background of the national cluster program in Russia and its first phase – the selection of the pilot innovative clusters – which was implemented last year. Special attention is given to the comparison of planned design of the Russian cluster program with such widely known cluster programs as the BioRegio, InnoRegio and Les poles de competitivite. The similarities and peculiarities of the Russian program have been defined that allowed to identify several most significant areas for improvement.

Suggested Citation

  • Evgeniy Kutsenko & Dirk Meissner, 2013. "Key Features Of The First Phase Of The National Cluster Program In Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 11/STI/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:wpbrp11sti2013
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    File URL: http://www.hse.ru/data/2013/04/18/1297845745/11STI2013.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Breschi, Stefano & Lissoni, Francesco, 2001. "Knowledge Spillovers and Local Innovation Systems: A Critical Survey," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, pages 975-1005.
    2. Madden, Gary & Savage, Scott J., 2000. "R&D spillovers, information technology and telecommunications, and productivity in ASIA and the OECD," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 367-392, December.
    3. Jorge Niosi & Majlinda Zhegu, 2005. "Aerospace Clusters: Local or Global Knowledge Spillovers?," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(1), pages 5-29.
    4. Paul Almeida & Bruce Kogut, 1999. "Localization of Knowledge and the Mobility of Engineers in Regional Networks," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 45(7), pages 905-917, July.
    5. Thomas Doring & Jan Schnellenbach, 2006. "What do we know about geographical knowledge spillovers and regional growth?: A survey of the literature," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 375-395.
    6. Kutsenko, E., 2012. "Path Dependence in Spatial Distribution of Economic Activity: Bad News for Empiric Research of Agglomeration Effects," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 10-26.
    7. Dirk Meissner, 2012. "The Economic Impact of Spillovers from R&D and Innovation," Foresight and STI Governance (Foresight-Russia till No. 3/2015), National Research University Higher School of Economics, vol. 6(4), pages 20-31.
    8. Max-Peter Menzel & Dirk Fornahl, 2007. "Cluster Life Cycles - Dimensions and Rationales of Cluster Development," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-076, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
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    Cited by:

    1. Konstantin Fursov & Ian Miles, 2013. "Framing Emerging Nanotechnologies: Steps Towards A Forward-Looking Analysis Of Skills," HSE Working papers WP BRP 15/STI/2013, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    2. repec:spr:jknowl:v:8:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s13132-017-0467-z is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Leonid Gokhberg & Vitaliy Roud, 2016. "Structural changes in the national innovation system: longitudinal study of innovation modes in the Russian industry," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 269-288, August.
    4. Ekaterina Islankina, 2015. "Internationalization Of Regional Clusters: Theoretical And Empirical Issues," HSE Working papers WP BRP 41/STI/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    5. Evgeniy Kutsenko, 2015. "Pilot Innovative Territorial Clusters in Russia: A Sustainable Development Mode," Foresight and STI Governance (Foresight-Russia till No. 3/2015), National Research University Higher School of Economics, vol. 9(1), pages 32-55.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Clusters; knowledge spillovers; cluster policy; innovation policy.;

    JEL classification:

    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology
    • O17 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Formal and Informal Sectors; Shadow Economy; Institutional Arrangements
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy
    • O38 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Government Policy
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R53 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Public Facility Location Analysis; Public Investment and Capital Stock

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