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Contracts, Job Security And Development Of The University

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  • Anna Panova

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics)

Abstract

The research success of a university requires ecient recruiting. The talents of candidates are unobservable for administrators, and so they delegate hiring to the faculty who have better knowledge of the job market. Since professors dislike putting their own employment at risk, faculty, especially less productive, have an incentive to hire less productive candidates to insure against getting red themselves. I argue that both tenure and strict long-term administrative positions mitigate this problem, and allow one to hire better candidates.

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Panova, 2014. "Contracts, Job Security And Development Of The University," HSE Working papers WP BRP 66/EC/2014, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:66/ec/2014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    tenure; academic contracts; university; job security;

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts
    • J54 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Producer Cooperatives; Labor Managed Firms
    • L29 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Other

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