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Immigrants’ Attitudes towards Redistribution: Implications for the Welfare State

Author

Listed:
  • Bergh, Andreas

    () (Ratio & Lund University)

  • Fink, Günther

    () (Harvard School of Public Health)

Abstract

Using data from the World Value Survey we examine first and second generation immigrants’ attitudes towards income inequality and redistribution. We find that first generation immigrants are on average less favorable to redistribution compared to non-immigrants. This effect is particularly pronounced in the Nordic welfare states, while in residual welfare states immigrants have stronger preferences for more government involvement, but not necessarily towards more redistribution. We find only marginal differences for second generation immigrants, suggesting a rather rapid adaptation of local norms and political preferences.

Suggested Citation

  • Bergh, Andreas & Fink, Günther, 2009. "Immigrants’ Attitudes towards Redistribution: Implications for the Welfare State," Ratio Working Papers 138, The Ratio Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ratioi:0138
    as

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    File URL: http://www.ratio.se/pdf/wp/ab_gf_immigrants.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Karin Mayr, 2007. "Immigration and income redistribution: A political economy analysis," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 131(1), pages 101-116, April.
    2. Dustmann Christian & Preston Ian P, 2007. "Racial and Economic Factors in Attitudes to Immigration," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-41, November.
    3. Yuji Tamura, 2006. "Disagreement over the immigration of low-income earners in a welfare state," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 19(4), pages 691-702, October.
    4. Borjas, George J, 1999. "Immigration and Welfare Magnets," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(4), pages 607-637, October.
    5. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim & Swagel, Phillip, 2002. "Tax burden and migration: a political economy theory and evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 167-190, August.
    6. Alesina, Alberto & La Ferrara, Eliana, 2002. "Who trusts others?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 207-234, August.
    7. Jim Dolmas & Gregory W. Huffman, 2004. "On The Political Economy Of Immigration And Income Redistribution," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 45(4), pages 1129-1168, November.
    8. Hans-Werner Sinn, 2004. "The New Systems Competition," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 5(1), pages 23-38, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; redistribution; welfare state; attitudes;

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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