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Congested Interregional Infrastructure, Road Pricing and Regional Labour Markets

Author

Listed:
  • McArthur, David Philip

    () (Stord/Haugesund University College)

  • Thorsen, Inge

    () (Stord/Haugesund University College)

  • Ubøe, Jan

    () (Dept. of Finance and Management Science, Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration)

Abstract

Traffic congestion and the policies to combat it have been studied extensively. However, most studies neglect the labour market impacts of congestion. Many also fail to account for the simultaneity between commuting and migration. This paper models impacts such as unemployment disparities, changes in commuting flows and changes in the flow of migrants by adopting an agent based simulation approach. This approach has the strength that it allows the simultaneous consideration of commuting, migration and labour force participation decisions. The results obtained have important theoretical and policy implications and show how an "optimal" charge may, in fact, be sub-optimal.

Suggested Citation

  • McArthur, David Philip & Thorsen, Inge & Ubøe, Jan, 2009. "Congested Interregional Infrastructure, Road Pricing and Regional Labour Markets," Discussion Papers 2009/3, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Business and Management Science.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:nhhfms:2009_003
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/11250/163970
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eliasson, Jonas, 2009. "A cost-benefit analysis of the Stockholm congestion charging system," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 468-480, May.
    2. McArthur, David & Thorsen, Inge & Ubøe, Jan, 2008. "An agent-based computational approach to explaining persistent spatial unemployment disparities," Discussion Papers 2008/17, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Business and Management Science.
    3. Sumaila, Ussif R. & Walters, Carl, 2005. "Intergenerational discounting: a new intuitive approach," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 135-142, January.
    4. Norman Henderson & Ian Bateman, 1995. "Empirical and public choice evidence for hyperbolic social discount rates and the implications for intergenerational discounting," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 5(4), pages 413-423, June.
    5. Noland, Robert B., 1997. "Commuter Responses to Travel Time Uncertainty under Congested Conditions: Expected Costs and the Provision of Information," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 377-406, May.
    6. Daniel J. Graham & Stephen Glaister, 2006. "Spatial Implications of Transport Pricing," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 40(2), pages 173-201, May.
    7. Small, Kenneth A. & Gomez-Ibanez, Jose A., 1999. "Urban transportation," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics,in: P. C. Cheshire & E. S. Mills (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 46, pages 1937-1999 Elsevier.
    8. Lind, Robert C, 1995. "Intergenerational equity, discounting, and the role of cost-benefit analysis in evaluating global climate policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 23(4-5), pages 379-389.
    9. Tesfatsion, Leigh, 2001. "Introduction to the special issue on agent-based computational economics," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 25(3-4), pages 281-293, March.
    10. Mark Partridge & Dan Rickman, 1997. "The Dispersion of US State Unemployment Rates: The Role of Market and Non-market Equilibrium Factors," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(6), pages 593-606.
    11. Weitzman, Martin L., 1998. "Why the Far-Distant Future Should Be Discounted at Its Lowest Possible Rate," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 201-208, November.
    12. Tesfatsion, Leigh S., 2008. "Agent-Based Computational Economics: Modeling Economies As Complex Adaptive Systems," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12974, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Congestion; Road pricing; Agent-based approach; Spatial interaction; Infrastructure investment;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • R48 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Government Pricing and Policy

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