IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hhs/eijswp/0142.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Export-Led Growth in East Asia: Lessons for Europe's Transition Economies

Author

Listed:
  • Kokko, Ari

    () (European Institute of Japanese Studies)

Abstract

The focus of the economic policy debate in most of Europe’s transition economies has shifted from stabilization and recovery to growth and convergence during the last few years. This paper summarizes some of the growth experiences of East Asia, and discusses some lessons for Europe’s transition economies. The relevant lessons from Asia focus on the importance of sound macroeconomic policies and an outward oriented trade regime, and highlight the need for public support for the development of trade infrastructure, including institutions for export financing, insurance, market research, and technology transfer. The Asian experiences also suggest that there is reason to be cautious regarding the objective to fix nominal exchange rates during periods of high growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Kokko, Ari, 2002. "Export-Led Growth in East Asia: Lessons for Europe's Transition Economies," EIJS Working Paper Series 142, Stockholm School of Economics, The European Institute of Japanese Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:eijswp:0142
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Katsuro Sakoh, 1984. "Japanese Economic Success: Industrial Policy or Free Market?," Cato Journal, Cato Journal, Cato Institute, vol. 4(2), pages 521-548, Fall.
    2. Takatoshi Ito & Peter Isard & Steven Symansky, 1999. "Economic Growth and Real Exchange Rate: An Overview of the Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis in Asia," NBER Chapters,in: Changes in Exchange Rates in Rapidly Developing Countries: Theory, Practice, and Policy Issues (NBER-EASE volume 7), pages 109-132 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jeffrey Sachs & Andrew M. Warner, 1996. "Achieving Rapid Growth in the Transition Economies of Central Europe," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0073, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1996. "Some Lessons from the East Asian Miracle," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 11(2), pages 151-177, August.
    5. A Kokko & Ruben Tansini & Mario Zejan, 1995. "Trade regimes and effects of FDI: evidence from Uruguay," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 0695, Department of Economics - dECON.
    6. Westphal, Larry E., 1978. "The republic of Korea's experience with export-led industrial development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 347-382, March.
    7. Chang, Ha-Joon, 1993. "The Political Economy of Industrial Policy in Korea," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(2), pages 131-157, June.
    8. Ari Kokko & Mario Zejan & Ruben Tansini, 2001. "Trade regimes and spillover effects of FDI: Evidence from Uruguay," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 137(1), pages 124-149, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Blomström, Magnus & Kokko, Ari, 2003. "The Economics of Foreign Direct Investment Incentives," EIJS Working Paper Series 168, Stockholm School of Economics, The European Institute of Japanese Studies.
    2. Christer Ljungwall, 2006. "Export-led Growth: Application to China's Provinces, 1978-2001," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 109-126.
    3. repec:eco:journ1:2017-04-07 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Rahardja, Sjamsu, 2007. "Big dragon, little dragons : China's challenge to the machinery exports of southeast Asia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4297, The World Bank.
    5. repec:eee:enepol:v:114:y:2018:i:c:p:394-402 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Zia, Bilal H., 2008. "Export incentives, financial constraints, and the (mis)allocation of credit: Micro-level evidence from subsidized export loans," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(2), pages 498-527, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    growth; export promotion; transition; EU accession;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • P30 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:eijswp:0142. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Nanhee Lee). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/eihhsse.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.