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Export-led Growth: Application to China's Provinces, 1978-2001


  • Christer Ljungwall


China's economic development has in many ways taken the world by storm, and no part of the country has been left fully unaffected. Many attempts have been made to explain the sources of this rapid, yet uneven, development. Previous studies on the specific relationship between growing exports and economic growth provide important information on the issue, but results from individual provinces are lacking. To fill the gap, this paper reviews the basic empirical question defined by the export-led growth (ELG) hypothesis, i.e. whether growth in exports drives growth in GDP, at the provincial level. The ELG hypothesis is validated in 13 of the 27 provinces in the sample.

Suggested Citation

  • Christer Ljungwall, 2006. "Export-led Growth: Application to China's Provinces, 1978-2001," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 109-126.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jocebs:v:4:y:2006:i:2:p:109-126 DOI: 10.1080/14765280600736866

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dani Rodrik, 1988. "Closing the Technology Gap: Does Trade Liberalization Really Help?," NBER Working Papers 2654, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    3. David Greenaway & David Sapsford, 1994. "What does liberalisation do for exports and growth?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 130(1), pages 152-174, March.
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    5. Xue, Jinjun, 1995. "The Export-led Growth Model and Its Application in China," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 36(2), pages 189-206, December.
    6. Toda, Hiro Y. & Yamamoto, Taku, 1995. "Statistical inference in vector autoregressions with possibly integrated processes," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1-2), pages 225-250.
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    8. Kokko, Ari, 2002. "Export-Led Growth in East Asia: Lessons for Europe's Transition Economies," EIJS Working Paper Series 142, Stockholm School of Economics, The European Institute of Japanese Studies.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tian, Xu & Zhang, Xiaoheng & Zhou, Yingheng & Yu, Xiaohua, 2016. "Regional income inequality in China revisited: A perspective from club convergence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 50-58.

    More about this item


    JEL Classifications: C32; F14; F19; O53;

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • F19 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Other
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East


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