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Job Polarization and Unskilled Employment Losses in France

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  • Sébastien Bock

    (PJSE - Paris Jourdan Sciences Economiques - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - INRA - Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)

Abstract

This paper provides an explanation for the decline in unskilled employment in a context of job polarization in France between 1982 and 2008. I argue that job polarization induced significant unskilled employment losses. Unskilled employment losses were enhanced by high and increasing labor taxation until 1993 while this trend has been mitigated by the implementation of labor cost reduction policies since then. The key mechanism is that job polarization displaces unskilled workers from routine jobs toward manual jobs and non-market work. Labor taxation interacts with job polarization by changing the value of unskilled jobs with respect to non-market work.

Suggested Citation

  • Sébastien Bock, 2018. "Job Polarization and Unskilled Employment Losses in France," PSE Working Papers halshs-01513037, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:psewpa:halshs-01513037
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01513037v2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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