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Population, land, and growth

Author

Listed:
  • Claire Loupias

    (EPEE - Centre d'Etudes des Politiques Economiques - UEVE - Université d'Évry-Val-d'Essonne)

  • Bertrand Wigniolle

    (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, PSE - Paris School of Economics - ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech - ENS Paris - École normale supérieure - Paris - PSL - Université Paris sciences et lettres - UP1 - Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - INRAE - Institut National de Recherche pour l’Agriculture, l’Alimentation et l’Environnement)

Abstract

This paper suggests a new explanation for changes in economic and population growth with a long run perspective, emphasizing the role of land in the development process. Starting from a pre-industrialization state called the "Malthusian regime", land and labor are the main production factors. The size of population is limited by the quantity of land available for households and by incomes. Technical progress driven by a "Boserupian effect" may push the economy towards a take-off regime. In this regime, capital accumulation begins and a "learning-by-doing" effect in production takes over from the "Boserupian effect". If this effect is strong enough, the economy can reach an "ultimate growth regime". In the different phases, land plays a crucial role.

Suggested Citation

  • Claire Loupias & Bertrand Wigniolle, 2013. "Population, land, and growth," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" halshs-00823255, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:pseose:halshs-00823255
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2012.11.006
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00823255
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Loupias, Claire & Wigniolle, Bertrand, 2019. "Technological changes and population growth: The role of land in England," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 198-210.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Endogenous fertility; Land; Endogenous growth;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D9 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand

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