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The Feldstein-Horiaka Puzzle: a Panel Smooth Transition Regression Approach

Listed author(s):
  • Julien Fouquau

    ()

    (LEO - Laboratoire d'économie d'Orleans - UO - Université d'Orléans - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

This paper proposes an original framework to determine the relative influence of fivefactors on the Feldstein and Horioka result of OECD countries with a strong saving-investment association. Based on panel threshold regression models, we establishcountry-specific and time-specific saving retention coefficients for 24 OECD coun-tries over the period 1960-2000. These coefficients are assumed to change smoothly,as a function of five threshold variables, considered as the most important in theliterature devoted to the Feldstein and Horioka puzzle. The results show that; de-gree of openness, country size and current account to GDP ratios have the greatestinfluence on the investment-saving relationship.

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Paper provided by HAL in its series Post-Print with number halshs-00222938.

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Date of creation: Jun 2007
Publication status: Published in Conférence du Canadian Economic Association, Jun 2007, Alisax, Canada
Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00222938
Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00222938
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  13. Haque, N. U. & Pesaran, M. H. & Sharma, Sunil, 1999. "Neglected Heterogeneity and Dynamics in Cross-country Savings Regressions," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9904, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  14. Gilbert Colletaz & Christophe Hurlin, 2006. "Threshold Effects of the Public Capital Productivity : An International Panel Smooth Transition Approach," Working Papers halshs-00008056, HAL.
  15. Hansen, Bruce E, 1996. "Inference When a Nuisance Parameter Is Not Identified under the Null Hypothesis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(2), pages 413-430, March.
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  17. Maurice Obstfeld & Kenneth Rogoff, 2001. "The Six Major Puzzles in International Macroeconomics: Is There a Common Cause?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2000, Volume 15, pages 339-412 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. Tesar, Linda L., 1991. "Savings, investment and international capital flows," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1-2), pages 55-78, August.
  19. Coakley, Jerry & Kulasi, Farida & Smith, Ron, 1996. "Current Account Solvency and the Feldstein-Horioka Puzzle," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(436), pages 620-627, May.
  20. Frankel, Jeffrey A, 1992. "Measuring International Capital Mobility: A Review," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 197-202, May.
  21. Bela Balassa, 1964. "The Purchasing-Power Parity Doctrine: A Reappraisal," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 72, pages 584-584.
  22. Baxter, Marianne & Crucini, Mario J, 1993. "Explaining Saving-Investment Correlations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 83(3), pages 416-436, June.
  23. Robin Brooks, 2003. "Population Aging and Global Capital Flows in a Parallel Universe," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 50(2), pages 1-3.
  24. Krol, Robert, 1996. "International capital mobility: evidence from panel data," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 467-474, June.
  25. Coakley, Jerry & Kulasi, Farida & Smith, Ron, 1998. "The Feldstein-Horioka Puzzle and Capital Mobility: A Review," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 3(2), pages 169-188, April.
  26. Ho, Tsung-Wu, 2003. "The saving-retention coefficient and country-size: The Feldstein-Horioka puzzle reconsidered," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 387-396, September.
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