IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hal/journl/hal-01645147.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The role of distance and social networks in the geography of crowdfunding: evidence from France

Author

Listed:
  • Sylvain Dejean

    () (CEREGE - CEntre de REcherche en GEstion - EA 1722 - IAE Poitiers - Institut d'Administration des Entreprises (IAE) - Poitiers - Université de Poitiers - Université de Poitiers - ULR - Université de La Rochelle)

Abstract

This article aims to estimate the cost of distance in the geographical flow of crowdfunding, and to show how social ties between the 94 French metropolitan regions shape the geography of funding. Our analysis draws upon a unique database provided by the French leader in rewards-based crowdfunding. The main result is that the elasticity of distance remains important (around 0.5), and that social ties between regions determine the flow of funding. Doubling the number of immigrants in a region increases the number of investments by 24% and reduces the impact of distance.

Suggested Citation

  • Sylvain Dejean, 2019. "The role of distance and social networks in the geography of crowdfunding: evidence from France," Post-Print hal-01645147, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01645147
    DOI: 10.1080/00343404.2019.1619924
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01645147v2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01645147v2/document
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Michael Storper & Anthony J. Venables, 2004. "Buzz: face-to-face contact and the urban economy," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 4(4), pages 351-370, August.
    2. Nataliya Barasinska & Dorothea Schäfer, 2014. "Is Crowdfunding Different? Evidence on the Relation between Gender and Funding Success from a German Peer-to-Peer Lending Platform," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 15(4), pages 436-452, November.
    3. Allan L. Riding, 2008. "Business angels and love money investors: segments of the informal market for risk capital," Venture Capital, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(4), pages 355-369, June.
    4. Bergstrand, Jeffrey H, 1985. "The Gravity Equation in International Trade: Some Microeconomic Foundations and Empirical Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(3), pages 474-481, August.
    5. Agrawal, Ajay & Kapur, Devesh & McHale, John, 2008. "How do spatial and social proximity influence knowledge flows? Evidence from patent data," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 258-269, September.
    6. Audretsch, David B & Feldman, Maryann P, 1996. "R&D Spillovers and the Geography of Innovation and Production," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 630-640, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Crowdfunding; economic geography; social networks; gravity;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01645147. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (CCSD). General contact details of provider: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.