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Electric utility regulation under enhanced renewable energy integration and distributed generation

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  • Nori Tarui

    () (Department of Economics, University of Hawaii at Manoa, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization (UHERO))

Abstract

The economic environment for electric utilities is changing in the United States given increased penetration of distributed generation and limited rooms for sales growth. This paper reviews the recent development of relevant policies in the United States and their economic impacts. This review indicates both challenges and opportunities in improving the policies to enhance distributed generation, and in finding the directions in which electric utility regulation should be reformed.

Suggested Citation

  • Nori Tarui, 2017. "Electric utility regulation under enhanced renewable energy integration and distributed generation," Working Papers 2017-2, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
  • Handle: RePEc:hae:wpaper:2017-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Georgi N. Todorov & Andrey I. Vlasov & Elena E. Volkova & Marina A. Osintseva, 2020. "Sustainability in Local Power Supply Systems of Production Facilities Where There Is the Compensatory Use of Renewable Energy Sources," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 10(3), pages 14-23.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    renewable energy; renewable portfolio standard; clean energy tax credit; net energy metering; utility regulation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • H24 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Personal Income and Other Nonbusiness Taxes and Subsidies
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy

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