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Travel Time Use Over Five Decades

Author

Listed:
  • Chong Song

    () (University of International Business and Economics)

  • Chao Wei

    () (George Washington University)

Abstract

In this paper, we use ve decades of time-use surveys in the U.S. to document trends in travel time uses. We nd that total travel time features an inverted-U shape, registering a 20 percent increase from 1975 to 1993, but an 18 percent decline from 1993 to 2013. We nd that demographic shifts explain roughly 45 percent of the increase from 1975 to 1993, but play a much smaller role afterwards. From 2003 to 2013 the shift of time allocation from travel-intensive non-market work to travel-non-intensive leisure accounts for around 50 percent of the decline in total travel time.

Suggested Citation

  • Chong Song & Chao Wei, 2016. "Travel Time Use Over Five Decades," Working Papers 2016-24, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2016-24
    as

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    File URL: https://www.gwu.edu/~iiep/assets/docs/papers/2016WP/WeiIIEPWP2016-24.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi, 1991. "The Allocation of Capital and Time over the Business Cycle," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(6), pages 1188-1214, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Travel time use; Tume-use survey; Market work; Non-market work; Leisure;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation

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