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Timing constraints and the allocation of time: The effects of changing shopping hours regulations in The Netherlands

  • Jacobsen, Joyce P.
  • Kooreman, Peter

A 1996 change in shopping hours regulations in the Netherlands provides an opportunity to study the effects of timing constraints on total time spent in shopping, working, and other activities as well as the timing of these activities. We develop a simple structural model to make predictions about the effects of imposition and relaxation of a timing constraint on time use patterns, and utilize time diary data from 1995, 1997, 1999, and 2000 to examine time use patterns by demographic group before and after the change. In addition to a change in the timing of shopping, we find a non-negligible increase in the total time spent shopping.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal European Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 49 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 9-27

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Handle: RePEc:eee:eecrev:v:49:y:2005:i:1:p:9-27
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eer

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  1. Marcel Kerkhofs & Peter Kooreman, 2003. "Identification and estimation of a class of household production models," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(3), pages 337-369.
  2. Thum, Marcel & Weichenrieder, Alfons, 1997. "'Dinkies' and Housewives: The Regulation of Shopping Hours," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(4), pages 539-59.
  3. Morrison, Steven A & Newman, Robert J, 1983. "Hours of Operation Restrictions and Competition among Retail Firms," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(1), pages 107-14, January.
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  7. Clemenz, Gerhard, 1990. "Non-sequential consumer search and the consequences of a deregulation of trading hours," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(7), pages 1323-1337, November.
  8. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2002. "Timing, togetherness and time windfalls," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 601-623.
  9. Ferris, J Stephen, 1990. "Time, Space, and Shopping: The Regulation of Shopping Hours," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(1), pages 171-87, Spring.
  10. Thomas Aronsson & Niklas Karlsson, 1997. "Taxes and Quantity Constraints in a Model of Male Labour Supply in Sweden," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 11(1), pages 201-221, 04.
  11. Paul Lanoie & Georges A. Tanguay & Luc Vallée, 1994. "Short-term Impact of Shopping-hour Deregulation: Welfare Implications and Policy Analysis," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 20(2), pages 177-188, June.
  12. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 1996. "The Timing of Work Time Over Time," NBER Working Papers 5855, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Chandra Bhat & Rajul Misra, 1999. "Discretionary activity time allocation of individuals between in-home and out-of-home and between weekdays and weekends," Transportation, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 193-229, May.
  14. Tanguay, Georges & Vallee, Luc & Lanoie, Paul, 1995. "Shopping Hours and Price Levels in the Retailing Industry: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(3), pages 516-24, July.
  15. Kan, Kamhon & Fu, Tsu-Tan, 1997. "Analysis Of Housewives' Grocery Shopping Behavior In Taiwan: An Application Of The Poisson Switching Regression," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(02), December.
  16. Jenkins, Stephen P & O'Leary, Nigel C, 1995. "Modelling Domestic Work Time," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 265-79, August.
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