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Explaining Sunday Shop Policies

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  • Elbert Dijkgraaf

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  • Raymond Gradus

Abstract

Dutch municipalities have the right to decide on Sunday shop opening hours since 1996. Despite positive effects on economic growth and employment, many municipalities restrict Sunday trading in one way or another. Based on 2003 data we show that especially religious and political afilliation, regional differences and the size of the municipalities explain the variation between municipalities. The number and size of shops and household characteristics are significant although their influence seems to be smaller. There is less evidence that excessive competition with neighbouring municipalities induces shop opening on Sundays, although cross-border shopping seems to play a role. Population density has no effect.
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Suggested Citation

  • Elbert Dijkgraaf & Raymond Gradus, 2007. "Explaining Sunday Shop Policies," De Economist, Springer, vol. 155(2), pages 207-219, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:decono:v:155:y:2007:i:2:p:207-219 DOI: 10.1007/s10645-007-9055-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Jacobsen, Joyce P. & Kooreman, Peter, 2005. "Timing constraints and the allocation of time: The effects of changing shopping hours regulations in The Netherlands," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 9-27, January.
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    14. Tanguay, Georges & Vallee, Luc & Lanoie, Paul, 1995. "Shopping Hours and Price Levels in the Retailing Industry: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 33(3), pages 516-524, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Paul, Annemarie, 2015. "After work shopping? Employment effects of a deregulation of shop opening hours in the German retail sector," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 329-353.
    2. Patrick Artus & Pierre Cahuc & André Zylberberg, 2007. "Réglementation du temps de travail, revenu et emploi," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00255820, HAL.
    3. Jacobsen, Joyce P. & Kooreman, Peter, 2005. "Timing constraints and the allocation of time: The effects of changing shopping hours regulations in The Netherlands," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 9-27, January.
    4. Raymond (R.H.J.M.) Gradus & Elbert (E.) Dijkgraaf, 2017. "Dutch Municipalities are Becoming Greener: Some Political and Institutional Explanations," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-086/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    5. Bonanno, Alessandro & Castellari, Elena & Scockai, Paolo, 2014. "The Effect of Trade Liberalization on Food Retail Structure and Food Price Levels in Italy: an Empirical Analysis," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182762, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic regulation; decentralization; Sunday opening; D78; L51;

    JEL classification:

    • D - Microeconomics
    • L - Industrial Organization

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