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Modelling Domestic Work Time

Author

Listed:
  • Jenkins, Stephen P
  • O'Leary, Nigel C

Abstract

What variables should be used as regressors in models of the length of time which people spend doing unpaid domestic work? To most economists, this answer would be straightforward: use the variables which are implied by theoretical model of household time allocation (e.g. Becker's). This paper shows that this strategy has not been followed, explores why this is so, and makes some recommendation about variable specification and the treatment of paid market work time in particular. The arguments are illustrated using regressions based on U.K. time budget data for the mid-1980s.

Suggested Citation

  • Jenkins, Stephen P & O'Leary, Nigel C, 1995. "Modelling Domestic Work Time," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 8(3), pages 265-279, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:8:y:1995:i:3:p:265-79
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard V. Burkhauser & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2000. "Microdata Panel Data and Public Policy: National and Cross-National Perspectives," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 23, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
    2. repec:spr:jopoec:v:31:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0667-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Miriam Beblo & Anne Solaz, 2015. "New spouse, same chores? A panel analysis of marital specialization in consecutive unions," Working Papers 217, Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED).
    4. Jacobsen, Joyce P. & Kooreman, Peter, 2005. "Timing constraints and the allocation of time: The effects of changing shopping hours regulations in The Netherlands," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 9-27, January.
    5. Jutta M. Joesch & C. Katharina Spiess, 2002. "European Mothers' Time with Children: Differences and Similarities across Nine Countries," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 305, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    6. Antonella Caiumi & Federico Perali, 2015. "Who bears the full cost of children? Evidence from a collective demand system," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 49(1), pages 33-64, August.
    7. Gigi Foster & Leslie S. Stratton, 2018. "Do significant labor market events change who does the chores? Paid work, housework, and power in mixed-gender Australian households," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(2), pages 483-519, April.
    8. Mancino, Lisa & Newman, Constance, 2007. "Who Has Time To Cook? How Family Resources Influence Food Preparation," Economic Research Report 55961, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    9. Mancino, Lisa & Newman, Constance, 2006. "Who's cooking? Time spent preparing food by gender, income and household composition," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21456, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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