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A Summary of Trends in American Time Allocation: 1965–2005

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  • Mark Aguiar
  • Erik Hurst

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  • Mark Aguiar & Erik Hurst, 2009. "A Summary of Trends in American Time Allocation: 1965–2005," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 93(1), pages 57-64, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:93:y:2009:i:1:p:57-64 DOI: 10.1007/s11205-008-9362-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Attanasio, Orazio & Davis, Steven J, 1996. "Relative Wage Movements and the Distribution of Consumption," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(6), pages 1227-1262, December.
    2. Mark Aguiar & Erik Hurst, 2008. "The Increase in Leisure Inequality," NBER Working Papers 13837, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Mark Aguiar & Erik Hurst, 2007. "Measuring Trends in Leisure: The Allocation of Time Over Five Decades," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 969-1006.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gillman, Max, 2012. "AS-AD in the Standard Dynamic Neoclassical Model: Business Cycles and Growth Trends," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2012/12, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    2. Elisabetta Lazzaro & Carlofilippo Frateschi, 2017. "Couples’ arts participation: assessing individual and joint time use," Journal of Cultural Economics, Springer;The Association for Cultural Economics International, vol. 41(1), pages 47-69, February.
    3. Chen Song & Chao Wei, 2015. "Travel Time Use Over Five Decades," Working Papers 2015-19, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    4. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1463-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Maria Stanfors & Frances Goldscheider, 2017. "The forest and the trees: Industrialization, demographic change, and the ongoing gender revolution in Sweden and the United States, 1870-2010," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(6), pages 173-226, January.
    6. Zhou Hui-fen & Li Zhen-shan & Xue Dong-qian & Lei Yang, 2012. "Time Use Patterns Between Maintenance, Subsistence and Leisure Activities: A Case Study in China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 105(1), pages 121-136, January.
    7. Campaña, Juan Carlos & Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto, 2015. "Gender differences in the distribution of total work-time of Latin- American families: the importance of social norms," MPRA Paper 62759, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Gimenez-Nadal, Jose Ignacio & Sevilla, Almudena, 2012. "Trends in time allocation: A cross-country analysis," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 56(6), pages 1338-1359.
    9. Jara-Díaz, Sergio & Rosales-Salas, Jorge, 2017. "Beyond transport time: A review of time use modeling," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 209-230.
    10. Whillans, Ashley V. & Dunn, Elizabeth W., 2015. "Thinking about time as money decreases environmental behavior," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 44-52.
    11. Campaña, Juan Carlos & Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, Jose Alberto, 2016. "Diferencias entre auto-empleados y asalariados en los usos del tiempo: Aragón vs. Spain
      [Differences between self-employees and wage-earners in time uses: Aragon vs. Spain]
      ," MPRA Paper 71463, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Jonathan Gershuny, 2011. "Increasing Paid Work Time? A New Puzzle for Multinational Time-diary Research," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 101(2), pages 207-213, April.
    13. Claudia Schmiedeberg & Jette Schröder, 2017. "Leisure Activities and Life Satisfaction: an Analysis with German Panel Data," Applied Research in Quality of Life, Springer;International Society for Quality-of-Life Studies, vol. 12(1), pages 137-151, March.

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