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Forecasting the USD/CNY Exchange Rate under Different Policy Regimes

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  • Yuxuan Huang

    () (The George Washington University)

Abstract

The USD/CNY exchange rate exhibits very different pattern in different periods as it changes wildly from one period to another according to the economic reforms and policies. This paper compares the performance of six different forecasting models of USD/CNY exchange rate under three different forecast scenarios from 2005-2015. In particular, the paper focuses in answering the following questions. (i) Do models' forecast performance change when the marketization level changes? (ii) Which model has the best forecast when the regimes change? (iii) Can forecasting robustifications help? The forecast results show that models incorporates economic fundamentals perform better in less regulated periods when the exchange rate can oat more freely. For the forecast experiments with breaks in the forecast origin, the exchange rate CVAR model perform the best before robustifications. In most cases, the intercept-correction and doubledifference device improve the forecast performance in both dynamic forecast and one-step forecast. Different models seem to do well under different forecast scenario after applying the robust devices.

Suggested Citation

  • Yuxuan Huang, 2016. "Forecasting the USD/CNY Exchange Rate under Different Policy Regimes," Working Papers 2016-001, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, Research Program on Forecasting.
  • Handle: RePEc:gwc:wpaper:2016-001
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    File URL: https://www2.gwu.edu/~forcpgm/2016-001.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Charles Engel & Nelson C. Mark & Kenneth D. West, 2015. "Factor Model Forecasts of Exchange Rates," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(1-2), pages 32-55, February.
    2. Mark, Nelson C. & Choi, Doo-Yull, 1997. "Real exchange-rate prediction over long horizons," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1-2), pages 29-60, August.
    3. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Chinn, Menzie D. & Pascual, Antonio Garcia, 2005. "Empirical exchange rate models of the nineties: Are any fit to survive?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 24(7), pages 1150-1175, November.
    4. Clements, Michael P. & Hendry, David F. (ed.), 2011. "The Oxford Handbook of Economic Forecasting," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195398649.
    5. Meese, Richard A. & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1983. "Empirical exchange rate models of the seventies : Do they fit out of sample?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1-2), pages 3-24, February.
    6. MacDonald, Ronald & Taylor, Mark P., 1994. "The monetary model of the exchange rate: long-run relationships, short-run dynamics and how to beat a random walk," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 276-290, June.
    7. Castle, Jennifer L. & Clements, Michael P. & Hendry, David F., 2013. "Forecasting by factors, by variables, by both or neither?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 177(2), pages 305-319.
    8. Hendry, David F., 2006. "Robustifying forecasts from equilibrium-correction systems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 135(1-2), pages 399-426.
    9. Juselius, Katarina, 2006. "The Cointegrated VAR Model: Methodology and Applications," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199285679.
    10. Chinn, Menzie D. & Meese, Richard A., 1995. "Banking on currency forecasts: How predictable is change in money?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(1-2), pages 161-178, February.
    11. Mark, Nelson C, 1995. "Exchange Rates and Fundamentals: Evidence on Long-Horizon Predictability," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(1), pages 201-218, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Exchange rates; Forecasting; US Dollar; Chinese Yuan;

    JEL classification:

    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • F37 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Finance Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods

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