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Housing wealth accumulation : The role of public housing

  • Florence Goffette-Nagot


    (Université de Lyon, Lyon, F-69007, France ; CNRS, GATE Lyon St Etienne,F-69130 Ecully, France)

  • Modibo Sidibé


    (Duke University, Department of Economics, Duke University, United States)

The public housing sector provides housing units at below-market rents, potentially allowing its tenants to save for a downpayment more quickly than they would have otherwise. In this paper, we analyze the e-ffect of a spell in public housing on age at first-time homeownership using the French Housing Survey. We use a pseudo-panel approach that takes into account the speci-cities of the local housing market, to derive individual tenure transitions from multiple cross-sections data. Using an IV strategy to control for a potential selection into public housing, we jointly estimate public housing tenancy and duration before -first-time homeownership, and take into account unobserved heterogeneity. Our results indicate that a spell in public housing increases the hazard to homeownership, supporting the idea that, in France, the public housing policy provides an important pathway to homeownership.

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Paper provided by Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique (GATE), Centre national de la recherche scientifique (CNRS), Université Lyon 2, Ecole Normale Supérieure in its series Working Papers with number 1343.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:gat:wpaper:1343
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  1. Jakob Roland Munch & Michael Rosholm & Michael Svarer, 2006. "Home Ownership, Job Duration, and Wages," CAM Working Papers 2006-08, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Applied Microeconometrics.
  2. David A. Reingold & Gregg G. Van Ryzin & Michelle Ronda, 2001. "Does Urban Public Housing Diminish the Social Capital and Labor Force Activity of Its Tenants?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 485-504.
  3. DUJARDIN, Claire & GOFFETTE-NAGOT, Florence, . "Does public housing occupancy increase unemployment?," CORE Discussion Papers RP 2164, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  4. Jakob Roland Munch & Michael Rosholm & Michael Svarer, 2006. "Are Homeowners Really More Unemployed?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(514), pages 991-1013, October.
  5. Janet Currie & Aaron Yelowitz, 1997. "Are Public Housing Projects Good for Kids?," NBER Working Papers 6305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. M. van Leuvensteijn & P. Koning, 2004. "The Effect of Home-ownership on Labor Mobility in The Netherlands," Working Papers 04-01, Utrecht School of Economics.
  7. Angela R. Fertig & David A. Reingold, 2007. "Public housing, health, and health behaviors: Is there a connection?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 831-860.
  8. Deaton, Angus, 1985. "Panel data from time series of cross-sections," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 30(1-2), pages 109-126.
  9. Thomas P. Boehm & Alan M. Schlottmann, 2009. "The Dynamics of Homeownership: Eliminating the Gap Between African American and White Households," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 37(4), pages 599-634.
  10. Boehm, Thomas P. & Schlottmann, Alan M., 2004. "The dynamics of race, income, and homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 113-130, January.
  11. Heckman, James & Singer, Burton, 1984. "A Method for Minimizing the Impact of Distributional Assumptions in Econometric Models for Duration Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 52(2), pages 271-320, March.
  12. Brian A. Jacob, 2004. "Public Housing, Housing Vouchers, and Student Achievement: Evidence from Public Housing Demolitions in Chicago," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 233-258, March.
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