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Mechanization in Ghana: Searching for sustainable service supply models:

Author

Listed:
  • Diao, Xinshen
  • Cossar, Frances
  • Houssou, Nazaire
  • Kolavalli, Shashidhara
  • Jimah, Kipo
  • Aboagye, Patrick

Abstract

This paper assesses the sustainability of the current supply network for mechanization, given government policy. Stylized models of mechanization supply are developed based on experience in Bangladesh, China, and India during similar stages of agricultural transformation. Ghana’s supply network is then analyzed in light of key lessons from the Asian experience. The analysis focuses on two policy issues: (1) whether the current model promoted by the government has left enough room for the private sector to develop the supply chain, including machinery imports and trade, and (2) whether this model can better link smallholders’ demand for mechanized services to its supply, such that supply can further induce demand and mechanization can broaden its role in agricultural transformation.

Suggested Citation

  • Diao, Xinshen & Cossar, Frances & Houssou, Nazaire & Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Jimah, Kipo & Aboagye, Patrick, 2012. "Mechanization in Ghana: Searching for sustainable service supply models:," IFPRI discussion papers 1237, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1237
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp01237.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. von Braun, Joachim & Gulati, Ashok & Fan, Shenggen, 2005. "Agricultural and economic development strategies and the transformation of China and India:," Annual report essays 2005EssayEN, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Shashidhara Kolavalli & Elizabeth Robinson & Guyslain Ngeleza & Felix Asante, 2012. "Economic Transformation in Ghana: Where Will the Path Lead?," Journal of African Development, African Finance and Economic Association (AFEA), vol. 14(2), pages 41-78.
    3. Erenstein, Olaf, 2006. "Intensification or extensification? Factors affecting technology use in peri-urban lowlands along an agro-ecological gradient in West Africa," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 90(1-3), pages 132-158, October.
    4. Gisselquist, David & Grether, Jean-Marie, 2000. "An Argument for Deregulating the Transfer of Agricultural Technologies to Developing Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(1), pages 111-127, January.
    5. Michael Johnson & Peter Hazell & Ashok Gulati, 2003. "The Role of Intermediate Factor Markets in Asia's Green Revolution: Lessons for Africa?," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1211-1216.
    6. Henry Schneider, 2010. "Moral Hazard in Leasing Contracts: Evidence from the New York City Taxi Industry," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(4), pages 783-805.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kirui, Oliver K. & von Braun, Joachim, 2018. "Mechanization in African Agriculture: A Continental Overview on Patterns and Dynamics," Working Papers 273522, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    2. repec:spr:ssefpa:v:9:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s12571-017-0716-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Zhang, Xiaobo & Yang, Jin & Thomas, Reardon, 2017. "Mechanization outsourcing clusters and division of labor in Chinese agriculture," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 184-195.
    4. Houssou, Nazaire & Diao, Xinshen & Kolavalli, Shashi, 2014. "Can the private sector lead agricultural mechanization in Ghana?," GSSP policy notes 4, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Takeshima, Hiroyuki & Edeh, Hyacinth & Lawal, Akeem & Isiaka, Moshud, 2014. "Tractor owner-operators in Nigeria: Insights from a small survey in Kaduna and Nasarawa states:," IFPRI discussion papers 1355, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Houssou, Nazaire & Chapoto, Anthony, 2015. "Adoption of Farm Mechanization, Cropland Expansion, and Intensification in Ghana," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211744, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    7. Houssou, Nazaire & Chapoto, Antony, 2014. "The changing landscape of agriculture in Ghana: Drivers of farm mechanization and its impacts on cropland expansion and intensification:," IFPRI discussion papers 1392, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Hiroyuki Takeshima & Hyacinth O. Edeh & Akeem O. Lawal & Moshudi A. Isiaka, 2015. "Characteristics of Private-Sector Tractor Service Provisions: Insights from Nigeria," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 53(3), pages 188-217, September.
    9. Benin, Samuel, 2014. "Impact of Ghana’s agricultural mechanization services center program:," IFPRI discussion papers 1330, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Srinivas Chokkakula & Mark Giordano, 2013. "Do policy and institutional factors explain the low levels of smallholder groundwater use in Sub-Saharan Africa?," Water International, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(6), pages 790-808, October.
    11. repec:eee:jfpoli:v:84:y:2019:i:c:p:133-145 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Silver, Jedediah & Benin, Samuel & Johnson, Michael E., 2015. "After the ten percent: Moving agriculture in Ghana," GSSP policy notes 7, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    13. Adu-Baffour, Ferdinand & Daum, Thomas & Birner, Regina, 2018. "Can Big Companies’ Initiatives to Promote Mechanization Benefit Small Farms in Africa? A Case Study from Zambia," Discussion Papers 273521, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).

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