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After the ten percent: Moving agriculture in Ghana

Author

Listed:
  • Kolavalli, Shashidhara
  • Silver, Jedediah
  • Benin, Samuel
  • Johnson, Michael E.

Abstract

Ghana is among the African nations that committed to develop agriculture as part of the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP), the agricultural program of the New Partnership for Africa’s Development(NEPAD), which in turn is a program of the African Union (AU). In the 2003 Maputo Declaration, which was reaffirmed at the 2014 AU Summit in Malabo, African leaders pledged to deepen their commitments to agricultural growth and agreed that increasing their spending on agriculture to 10 percent of annual national budgets and achieving 6 percent annual growth in the sector would be indicators of that deeper commitment.

Suggested Citation

  • Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Silver, Jedediah & Benin, Samuel & Johnson, Michael E., 2015. "After the ten percent: Moving agriculture in Ghana," GSSP policy notes 7, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:gssppn:7
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Benin, Samuel & Mogues, Tewodaj & Cudjoe, Godsway & Randriamamonjy, Josee, 2009. "Public expenditures and agricultural productivity growth in Ghana," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51634, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Diao, Xinshen & Cossar, Frances & Houssou, Nazaire & Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Jimah, Kipo & Aboagye, Patrick, 2012. "Mechanization in Ghana: Searching for sustainable service supply models:," IFPRI discussion papers 1237, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Benin, Samuel & Makombe, Tsitsi & Johnson, Michael E., 2014. "Aid effectiveness in Ghana: How’s the L’Aquila food security initiative doing?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1359, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Minot, Nicholas & Benson, Todd, 2009. "Fertilizer subsidies in Africa: Are vouchers the answer?," Issue briefs 60, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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