IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fpr/ifprid/1365.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Identifying agricultural expenditures within the public financial accounts and coding system in Ghana: Is the ten percent government agriculture expenditure overestimated?:

Author

Listed:
  • Benin, Samuel

Abstract

This paper is part of four country case studies that take a detailed look at public expenditures in agriculture, and at how the data on expenditures are captured in government financial and budget accounts. The objective of these studies is to unpack the black box of public expenditure statistics reported in various cross-country datasets, and ultimately to enable the use of existing government accounts to identify levels and compositions of government agriculture expenditures, with better understanding of what these data are in fact accounting for.

Suggested Citation

  • Benin, Samuel, 2014. "Identifying agricultural expenditures within the public financial accounts and coding system in Ghana: Is the ten percent government agriculture expenditure overestimated?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1365, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1365
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://cdm15738.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getfile/collection/p15738coll2/id/128248/filename/128459.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Benin, Samuel & Mogues, Tewodaj & Cudjoe, Godsway & Randriamamonjy, Josee, 2009. "Public expenditures and agricultural productivity growth in Ghana," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51634, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Fan, Shenggen, 2008. "Public expenditures, growth, and poverty in developing countries: Lessons from developing countries," Issue briefs 51, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Flaherty, Kathleen & Essegbey, George Owusu & Asare, Roland, 2010. "Ghana: Recent developments in agricultural research," ASTI Country Brief 2578, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Fan, Shenggen (ed.), 2008. "Public expenditures, growth, and poverty: Lessons from developing countries," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-8018-8859-5.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Anson, Richard & Mogues, Tewodaj, 2016. "A systematic review of cross-country data initiatives on agricultural public expenditures in developing countries:," IFPRI discussion papers 1541, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Benin, Samuel, 2016. "Returns to agricultural public spending in Ghana: Cocoa versus noncocoa subsector:," IFPRI discussion papers 1503, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Younger, Stephen D. & Benin, Samuel, 2017. "The effects of a CAADP-compliant budget on poverty and inequality in Ghana:," IFPRI discussion papers 1677, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    public expenditure; Public investment; Agricultural development; Public policy; Maputo Declaration; public financial management;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1365. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ifprius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.