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An Argument for Deregulating the Transfer of Agricultural Technologies to Developing Countries

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  • Gisselquist, David
  • Grether, Jean-Marie

Abstract

In the past few decades many developing countries have liberalized trade and investment, removing barriers to imports and allowing the introduction of new foreign technologies. Unfortunately, agriculture often remains outside this reform process. Regulatory obstacles continue to restrain the transfer of technologies through private trade in seeds and other inputs. Industrial countries characteristically allow the transfer of private and public technologies through multiple channels. Developing countries often force technology transfer through a single channel controlled by government agencies, with an emphasis on official performance tests. This article analyzes the institutional arrangements governing the international transfer of new agricultural technologies, examining the cases of agricultural machinery in Bangladesh and seed varieties in Turkey. The analysis shows that allowing the private transfer of technologies and refocusing input regulations on externalities could lead to significant productivity and income gains in developing countries. Copyright 2000 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Gisselquist, David & Grether, Jean-Marie, 2000. "An Argument for Deregulating the Transfer of Agricultural Technologies to Developing Countries," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 14(1), pages 111-127, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:wbecrv:v:14:y:2000:i:1:p:111-27
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    Cited by:

    1. Spielman, David J. & Ma, Xingliang, 2014. "Intellectual property rights, technology diffusion, and agricultural development: Cross-country evidence:," IFPRI discussion papers 1345, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Dana G. Dalrymple, 2008. "International agricultural research as a global public good: concepts, the CGIAR experience and policy issues," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 347-379.
    3. Diao, Xinshen & Cossar, Frances & Houssou, Nazaire & Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Jimah, Kipo & Aboagye, Patrick, 2012. "Mechanization in Ghana: Searching for sustainable service supply models:," IFPRI discussion papers 1237, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Bardhan, Pranab, 2006. "Globalization and rural poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 1393-1404, August.
    5. Diao, Xinshen & Cossar, Frances & Houssou, Nazaire & Kolavalli, Shashidhara, 2014. "Mechanization in Ghana: Emerging demand, and the search for alternative supply models," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 168-181.
    6. Tihanyi, Laszlo & Roath, Anthony S., 2002. "Technology transfer and institutional development in Central and Eastern Europe," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 188-198, October.
    7. Pranab Bardhan, 2006. "Globalization, Inequality, and Poverty," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 9126, Inter-American Development Bank.
    8. Bardhan, Pranab, 2011. "Globalization, Inequality, and Poverty," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 2329, Inter-American Development Bank.
    9. Esposti, Roberto, 2002. "Public agricultural R&D design and technological spill-ins: A dynamic model," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 693-717, July.
    10. Hugo De Groote & George Owuor & Cheryl Doss & James Ouma & Lutta Muhammad & K. Danda, 2005. "The Maize Green Revolution in Kenya Revisited," The Electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, vol. 2(1), pages 32-49.
    11. Hosaki Kono, 2011. "Economic Integration and Poverty," Chapters, in: Masahisa Fujita & Ikuo Kuroiwa & Satoru Kumagai (ed.), The Economics of East Asian Integration, chapter 16, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Rohrbach, D. D. & Minde, I. J. & Howard, J., 2003. "Looking beyond national boundaries: regional harmonization of seed policies, laws and regulations," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 317-333, August.

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