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Improving the measurement of food security:

  • Headey, Derek D.
  • Ecker, Olivier

Although food security measurement has been substantially expanded in recent decades, there persists significant dissatisfaction with existing measurement systems, especially in the wake of the global food and financial crisis. In this paper we first set out a list of criteria that an ideal food security measurement system should satisfy. We then benchmark existing indicators and measurement systems against those criteria as a means of systematically identifying their relative strengths and weaknesses. Our concluding section outlines possible steps for improving food security measurement through a mixture of extension, coordination, and innovation.

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Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI discussion papers with number 1225.

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Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1225
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  1. Angus Deaton, 2012. "The financial crisis and the well-being of Americans," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(1), pages 1-26, January.
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  5. Gabbert, Silke & Weikard, Hans-Peter, 2001. "How widespread is undernourishment?: A critique of measurement methods and new empirical results," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 209-228, June.
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  8. Robert Breunig & Deborah Cobb-Clark & Xiaodong Gong & Danielle Venn, 2007. "Disagreement in Australian partners’ reports of financial difficulty," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 59-82, March.
  9. de Haen, Hartwig & Klasen, Stephan & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "What do we really know? Metrics for food insecurity and undernutrition," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(6), pages 760-769.
  10. Headey, Derek & Chiu, Alice & Kadiyala, Suneetha, 2011. "Agriculture's role in the Indian enigma: Help or hindrance to the undernutrition crisis?," IFPRI discussion papers 1085, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  11. Elkana Ngwenya & Ranjan Ray, 2007. "Changes in Indonesian Food Consumption Patterns and their Nutritional Implications," Working Papers 2486, University of Tasmania, School of Economics and Finance, revised Nov 2007.
  12. Angus Deaton & Olivier Dupriez, 2011. "Purchasing Power Parity Exchange Rates for the Global Poor," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 137-66, April.
  13. Wiesmann, Doris & Bassett, Lucy & Benson, Todd & Hoddinott, John, 2009. "Validation of the world food programme's food consumption score and alternative indicators of household food security:," IFPRI discussion papers 870, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  14. Rafael E. de Hoyos & Denis Medvedev, 2011. "Poverty Effects of Higher Food Prices: A Global Perspective," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 387-402, 08.
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