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The quiet revolution in India's food supply chains:

  • Reardon, Thomas
  • Minten, Bart

There has been a rapid transformation of food supply chains in India over the past two decades. Modern retail sales are growing at 49 percent per year and quickly penetrating urban food markets and even rural markets. The food-processing sector is growing quickly while also concentrating and undergoing a rapid increase in the capital-output ratio, with little increase in employment. A modern segment is emerging in the wholesale sector, with the penetration of modern logistics firms and specialized modern wholesalers.

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Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI discussion papers with number 1115.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1115
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  1. Forhad Shilpi & Dina Umali-Deininger, 2008. "Market facilities and agricultural marketing: evidence from Tamil Nadu, India," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(3), pages 281-294, November.
  2. Bell, Clive & Srinivasan, T N, 1989. "Interlinked Transactions in Rural Markets: An Empirical Study of Andhra Pradesh, Bihar and Punjab," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 51(1), pages 73-83, February.
  3. A. Banerji & J.V. Meenakshi, 2004. "Buyer Collusion and Efficiency of Government Intervention in Wheat Markets in Northern India: An Asymmetric Structural Auctions Analysis," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 86(1), pages 236-253.
  4. Landes, Maurice R. & Burfisher, Mary E., 2009. "Growth and Equity Effects of Agricultural Marketing Efficiency Gains in India," Economic Research Report 55959, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  5. Rashid, Shahidur & Cummings, Ralph Jr. & Gulati, Ashok, 2005. "Grain marketing parastatals in Asia," MTID discussion papers 80, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Minten, Bart & Reardon, Thomas & Sutradhar, Rajib, 2010. "Food Prices and Modern Retail: The Case of Delhi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(12), pages 1775-1787, December.
  7. Theodosios B. Palaskas & Barbara Harriss-White, 1996. "The identification of market exogeneity and market dominance by tests instead of assumption: An application to Indian material," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(1), pages 111-123.
  8. Dina Umali-Deininger & Mona Sur, 2007. "Food safety in a globalizing world: opportunities and challenges for India," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(s1), pages 135-147, December.
  9. Bell, Clive, 1988. "Credit markets and interlinked transactions," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 16, pages 763-830 Elsevier.
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