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Managing interactions between household food security and preschooler health:


  • Haddad, Lawrence James
  • Bhattarai, Saroj
  • Immink, Maarten D. C.
  • Kumar, Shubh K.


Food security does not assure good nutrition. The nutritional status of an individual is influenced not only by food but also by nonfood factors, such as clean water, sanitation, and health care. The effect of all of these factors must be considered in efforts to rid the world of malnutrition. Food security will result in good nutrition only if nonfood factors are effectively dealt with. In this paper, Lawrence Haddad, Saroj Bhattarai, Maarten Immink, and Shubh Kumar show how malnutrition among preschool children is determined by a complex interaction of illness and lack of food. The authors look at three countries —Ethiopia, Pakistan, and the Philippines — to study how food availability and diarrhea interact and what this interaction means for preschooler malnutrition. Their results show that the links between food consumption, diarrhea, and malnutrition are stronger than most economic studies have assumed. When diarrhea is prevalent, the effects of food shortages on child malnutrition are worse, and when food is scarce, the effects of diarrhea on child malnutrition are worse.

Suggested Citation

  • Haddad, Lawrence James & Bhattarai, Saroj & Immink, Maarten D. C. & Kumar, Shubh K., 1996. "Managing interactions between household food security and preschooler health:," 2020 vision discussion papers 16, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:2020dp:16

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Brown, Lynn R. & Webb, Patrick & Haddad, Lawrence, 1994. "The role of labour in household food security: implications of AIDS in Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 568-573, December.
    2. Cornia, Giovanni Andrea, 1994. "Poverty, Food Consumption, and Nutrition during the Transition to the Market Economy in Eastern Europe," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 297-302, May.
    3. Teklu, Tesfaye & von Braun, Joachim & Zaki, Elsayed & Ali, Ahmed, 1991. "Drought and famine relationships in Sudan: policy implications," Research reports 88, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Kumar, Shubh K., 1979. "Impact of subsidized rice on food consumption and nutrition in Kerala:," Research reports 5, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Kennedy, Eileen T. & Cogill, Bruce, 1987. "Income and nutritional effects of the commercialization of agriculture in southwestern Kenya:," Research reports 63, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Osmani, S R, 1994. "Economic Reform and Social Welfare: The Case of Nutrition in Sri Lanka," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 291-296, May.
    7. Strauss, J. & Thomas, D., 1995. "Empirical Modeling of Household and Family Decisions," Papers 95-12, RAND - Reprint Series.
    8. Bouis, Howarth E. & Haddad, Lawrence James, 1990. "Effects of agricultural commercialization on land tenure, household resource allocation, and nutrition in the Philippines:," Research reports 79, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. G. M. Arif, 2004. "Child Health and Poverty in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 43(3), pages 211-238.
    2. Patrick Webb, 2005. "Water and Food Insecurity in Developing Countries:Major Challenges for the 21st Century," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 29, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.
    3. Smith, Lisa C. & Naiken, Logan, 1998. "Can FAO's measure of chronic undernourishment be strengthened?," FCND discussion papers 44, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).


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