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Anatomy of a Market Crash: A Market Microstructure Analysis of the Turkish Overnight Liquidity Crisis

  • Burak Saltoglu
  • Jon Danielsson

    ()

An order flow model, where the coded identity of the counterpartiesof every trade is known, hence providing institution level order flow, isapplied to both stable and crisis periods in a large and liquid overnightrepo market in an emerging market economy. Institution level orderflow is much more informative than cross sectionally aggregated orderflow. The informativeness of institution level order flow increaseswith financial instability, with considerable heterogeneity in the yieldimpact across institutions.

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Paper provided by Financial Markets Group in its series FMG Discussion Papers with number dp456.

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Date of creation: Jun 2003
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Handle: RePEc:fmg:fmgdps:dp456
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.lse.ac.uk/fmg/

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  1. Hartmann, Philipp & Manna, Michele & Manzanares, Andres, 2001. "The Microstructure of the Euro Money Market," CEPR Discussion Papers 3081, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Shang-Jin Wei & Jungshik Kim, 1999. "The Big Players in the Foreign Exchange Market: Do They Trade on Information or Noise?," CID Working Papers 5, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
  3. Andrew W. Lo & A. Craig MacKinlay & June Zhang, . "Econometric Models of Limit-Order Executions," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 12-99, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
  4. Jon Danielsson & Richard Payne, 1999. "Real Trading Patterns and Prices in Spot Foreign Exchange Markets," FMG Discussion Papers dp320, Financial Markets Group.
  5. Easley, David & O'Hara, Maureen, 1987. "Price, trade size, and information in securities markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 69-90, September.
  6. Harris, Lawrence & Hasbrouck, Joel, 1996. "Market vs. Limit Orders: The SuperDOT Evidence on Order Submission Strategy," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 31(02), pages 213-231, June.
  7. Goodhart, Charles, 1988. "The Foreign Exchange Market: A Random Walk with a Dragging Anchor," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 55(220), pages 437-60, November.
  8. Benjamin Cohen & Hyun Song Shin, 2002. "Positive feedback trading under stress: evidence from the US Treasury securities market," BIS Papers chapters, in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), Market functioning and central bank policy, volume 12, pages 148-180 Bank for International Settlements.
  9. Peiers, Bettina, 1997. " Informed Traders, Intervention, and Price Leadership: A Deeper View of the Microstructure of the Foreign Exchange Market," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1589-1614, September.
  10. Covrig, Vicentiu & Melvin, Michael, 2002. "Asymmetric information and price discovery in the FX market: does Tokyo know more about the yen?," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 271-285, August.
  11. Hasbrouck, Joel, 1995. " One Security, Many Markets: Determining the Contributions to Price Discovery," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1175-99, September.
  12. Hasbrouck, Joel, 1991. " Measuring the Information Content of Stock Trades," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 46(1), pages 179-207, March.
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